Tag Archives: Thai tamples

Wat Yai Chaimongkol, Ayutthaya

       Wat Yai Chaimongkol is considered the most important historical temple in Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Province, as well as one of the most popular tourist temples. As a result, it is common to see a large number of tourists visiting this temple. This Wat Yai Chaimongkhon is notable for its historical story from the Ayutthaya period, as well as its outstanding architecture. See Ayutthaya’s tallest chedi. The palace of King Naresuan the Great is located behind the temple. People are welcome to come and worship. In addition, there is a lovely garden in the surrounding area where you can unwind. Tourists who wish to visit Ayutthaya should not pass it up.

Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon (Chai Mongkhon Temple), Ayutthaya, Thailand

Wat Yai Chaimongkol's History

       It is one of Thailand’s oldest temples. It was constructed during the reign of King Ramathibodi I, also known as King U-Thong, the founder of Ayutthaya, in the early Ayutthaya period. According to legend, in 1357, King U-Thong ordered the exhumation of Chao Kaew’s body from his grave after he died of cholera, and the body was burned. Following that, the site was transformed into a monastery known as “Wat Pa Kaeo.” Later, the monks were ordained by the Rattana Maha Thera in Sri Lanka, returning to the temple. The people of Ayutthaya held high regard for these monks. As a result, more people are flocking to Wat Pa Kaew to be ordained. The King U-Thong Monastery So he appointed Somdej Phra Wanratana as the temple’s abbot.

Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon (Chai Mongkhon Temple), Ayutthaya, Thailand

A significant episode in the history of Wat Pa Kaew

       The temple’s ubosot used to be where a group of people planned to eliminate Khun Worawongsathirat and Thao Srisudachan. Their plan was successful at the time, so he invited Phra Thienracha to ascend the throne, naming the Great King, B.E. 2104. During the King’s reign, a royal command was issued to the Patriarch of Wat Pa Kaew to carry out the sentence. The base was dedicated to the auspicious occasion of Phra Srisin’s rebellion in B.E. 2135. There was a significant event that leads us to believe that the main chedi of the temple was built to commemorate the king’s victory over the Viceroy of Burma. As a result, it is thought that the name Wat Yai Chaimongkol derives from this.

       Interest point Chedi Chaimongkol, a monument to King Naresuan the Great’s great victory over Mangayo Java, Viceroy of Hong Sawadee in Nong Sarai Subdistrict, Suphan Buri Province. Burmese troops had crossed the border into Khanthasima at the time. King Naresuan and his younger brother, Somdej Thotsarot, led the army to battle and drove the elephant into the enemy’s encirclement, while the enemy attempted to fire on the king. Because the generals were unable to catch up with the king in time, the king declared loudly, “Lord, we will stand in the shade of the tree and invite us to come out and do the battle together to be honored in the land.” No king would be able to win battles in the future. The viceroy of Burma, an occult elephant, came out to fight alongside King Naresuan in the battle of that time, and King Naresuan was able to defeat the enemy commander.

Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon (Chai Mongkhon Temple), Ayutthaya, Thailand

       When the king returned to Siam, he punished the soldiers who did not follow the king during the battle in accordance with the rules and had to face the death penalty. In the period of criminal waiting for punishment, Somdej Phra Panrat, the Buddhist supreme patriarch of Buddhist priests, asked the king to pardon all soldiers, along with 25 monks. By claiming that he was compared to Lord Buddha, who was surrounded by a swarm of demons before attaining enlightenment. It is the honor and prestige of his bravery and adaptability that will spread throughout the land. Please construct a larger pagoda to symbolize his victory and mercy in order to save those soldiers’ lives. The pagoda was given the name “Chedi Chai Mongkhon” by the King.

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Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon (Chai Mongkhon Temple), Ayutthaya, Thailand

Getting from Bangkok to Ayutthaya

       From Bangkok, a private car can take you to the province of Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya. There are several options, as shown below. Drive past Pratunam Phra In on Highway No. 1 (Phahon Yothin Road). Then take Highway No. 32, then Highway No. 309 into Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Province. Take Highway 304 (Chaeng Watthana Road) or Highway 302 (Ngamwongwan Road), then turn right onto Highway 306 (Tiwanon Road) and cross the Nonthaburi or Nuan Chawee Bridges. To reach Pathum Thani Province, take the Pathum Thani-Samkhok-Sena (Highway 3111) route and turn right at Sena District. Take Highway No. 3263 to the province of Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya.

Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon (Chai Mongkhon Temple), Ayutthaya, Thailand

Travelers can use the Google Maps application to find more suitable routes.

       By van: Tourists can catch a Bangkok-Ayutthaya van at the Mo Chit Bus Terminal or the Future Park Rangsit shopping mall; the fare starts at 60 baht, depending on the distance and pick-up point.

       By train: Visitors can take the train from Hua Lamphong Station to the north. Take the train to Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Station. The trains run daily from 04.20 a.m. to 10.45 p.m., with fares starting at 15 baht for third-class trains. For more information, tourists can call the State Railway of Thailand at 1690 or visit www.railway.co.th.

Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon (Chai Mongkhon Temple), Ayutthaya, Thailand

What is the best way to get to Wat Yai Chaimongkol?

-a private vehicle Wat Chaiwatthanaram is located on the outskirts of Ayutthaya. Using the path that connects the Kasattrathirat Bridge to the Chao Phraya River, turn left as you exit the bridge. Then drive straight for about 750 meters until you reach the temple. (A parking lot is available in front of the temple.)

-Tuk-Tuk: Tuk-tuks are available in Ayutthaya for 20-40 baht per person, depending on distance. in order to rent a car. The cost of renting a tuk-tuk for an hour is approximately 200 baht.

– Grabcar, Ayutthaya, has a ride-hailing system via the Grab app. Before you click to call the car to various locations, you can always check the fare rate on the screen. Tourists can get the Grab app by going to http://grb.to/2F9a2bx.

Wat Yai Chaimongkol is open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission: There is no charge to visit.

All year round is the best time to travel.

Location: Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Province, Khlong Suan Phlu Subdistrict

Location on Google Maps: https://goo.gl/maps/isqkPEhTsCXvH7tu6

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/watyai

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Wat Phra Sri Sanphet, Ayutthaya

       One of the World Heritage Sites is Wat Phra Sri Sanphet. The former royal temple in the province of Ayutthaya. It is the former royal temple of Ayutthaya’s historic palace. Somdej Phra Borommatrailokkanat constructed it around 1492. The three Lanka-shaped chedis that tower tall at Wat Phra Si Sanphet are a major attraction. It is a significant historical landmark in Thailand with a magnificent appeal.

Wat Phra Sri Sanphet, Ayutthaya, Thailand

Wat Phra Si Sanphet story

       Wat Phra Si Sanphet, like Wat Phra Kaeo in Bangkok, was built inside the Grand Palace enclosure in 1491 and served as the royal chapel. Its foundations can be seen today. King U-Thong built Wang Lung Palace (Royal Palace) when the city was founded. Originally a residential palace, it was converted to a monastery during King Ramathibodi I’s reign. This residential palace was changed into a temple and the establishment of Wat Phra Si Sanphet when King Borom Trai Lokanat ordered the construction of new living quarters. This was the city’s largest temple during Ayutthaya’s glory days. The ashes of three Ayutthaya monarchs are kept in the three principal chedis that have been repaired. The temple is located at Si Sanphet Road’s northern end. There are no monks or novices living in the royal chapel.

Wat Phra Sri Sanphet, Ayutthaya, Thailand

       Wat Phra Sri Sanphet lies in the Pratu Chai subdistrict of Ayutthaya province’s Phra Nakorn Si Ayutthaya district. For a long time, the temple has been considered not just a major historical place, but also the spiritual core of Thais. Wat Phra Sri Sanphet is the royal monastery on the grounds of the royal palace, and no monks are permitted to live there. The temple, on the other hand, was used to hold royal court ceremonies, such as the pledge of allegiance drinking ceremony. It is also recognized as a model for Wat Phra Sri Ratana Sasadaram (the royal temple of the Emerald Buddha) or Wat Phra Kaew in Bangkok, and as an equivalency to Wat Mahathat in Sukhothai.

Wat Phra Sri Sanphet, Ayutthaya, Thailand

       Somdet Phra Ramathibodi I, or King U-thong, ordered the construction of his royal residence in this region, but when Somdet Phra Borom Tilokkanat succeeded in the throne, he pondered moving the royal palace north and transforming the territory into sacred ground, which later became this temple. A large Buddha image was cast under the reign of Ramathibodi II. Phra Sri Sanphetdayan’s Buddha image stands 16 meters tall and is covered with 143 kilos of Thai gold. It had been kept inside the assembly hall until 1767, when the Burmese stormed Ayutthaya and melted the gilded gold away. The Buddha image had been severely damaged, so during the Rattanakosin period, Phra Bat Somdet Phra Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke installed the broken core of Phra Sri Sanphetdayan in a pagoda inside Wat Phra Chetupon Vimolmangkalararm Rajvoramahaviharn in Bangkok, and named the pagoda Chedi Sri Sanphetdayan.

Wat Phra Sri Sanphet, Ayutthaya, Thailand

       The temple repair was first ordered by Somdet Phrachaoyuhua Borommakot. During the reign of Phrabat Somdet Phra Chulachomklao Chao Yuhua (King Rama V), the regional intendant, Phraya Boran Rachathanin, discovered a sizable collection of antiquities in the pagoda’s underground chamber, including Buddha statues and gold jewelry. Field Marshal P. Piboonsongkram then appointed a group to renovate the ruins until they were restored to their original state. This royal monastery has a vital place in art and archaeological history. The ruins still show how magnificent the land was at the time. Three adjacent Ceylonese (or bell-shaped) pagodas are set on rectangular platforms in the temple’s centre. These platforms are thought to have served as the foundation for royal houses during the Ayutthaya period. The temple is now known as the symbol of the province of Ayutthaya.

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Wat Phra Sri Sanphet, Ayutthaya, Thailand

How to travel to Wat Phra Sri Sanphet

– By private car, drive from Bangkok along the Asian highway (Highway 32) to Ayutthaya, then through the roundabout and over the Pridi Banomyong Bridge. Continue straight until you reach Si Sanphet Road, then turn right and drive past the roundabout until you see the entrance to Wat Phra Si Sanphet.

– via bus Visitors can take a minivan to Ayutthaya and then rent a tuk-tuk for a full day trip. However, if you know how to ride a motorcycle, there will be a motorcycle rental shop near the bus terminal and in front of the train station.

– Via train Traveling by train is another option for tourists departing from Bangkok because it allows them to save money while also allowing them to observe the scenery on both sides of the river. Tourists can board the train at Hua Lamphong Railway Station. Every day, there is a train service that stops at Ayutthaya Railway Station. Then hire a tuk-tuk to take you there, or rent a motorbike to travel on your own.

         Entrance fee to Wat Phra Si Sanphet is 10 baht per adult for Thais and 50 baht for foreigners, or you can buy a combination ticket for visiting various temples around Ayutthaya Historical Park for 40 baht per person for Thais and 220 baht for foreigners. Children, students, and students do not have to pay admission.

call 0 3524 2284 or 0 3524 2286.

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Wat Rakhangkhositaram, Bangkok

       Wat Rakhangkhositaram is a Buddhist temple in Rakhangkhositaram, Thailand. One of the oldest and famous temples in Bangkok. Many people are familiar with this temple because of its well-known and popular amulet. Thai people believe that if they have the opportunity to make merit at Wat Rakhang, it will make their life popular and famous throughout the year, much like the temple’s name, which refers to the huge bell. This beautiful temple is steeped in history. It is a convenient mode of transportation that is popular with both Thai and foreign tourists. If you ever have the opportunity to visit Thailand, don’t miss out on visiting and making merit at Wat Rakhangkhositaram.

Wat Rakhangkhositaram

Wat Rakhangkhositaram history

      Wat Rakhang is a second-class royal monastery and the temple has an old Tripitaka hall, which inside, there’re beautiful and precious Thai paintings, It is on Arun Amarin Road in Bangkok, near Siriraj Hospital, Wang Lang Market, and Ban Khamin Junction. The former name is the “Wat Bangwayai” building in the Ayutthaya period. King Taksin of Thonburi Kingdom required restoring the temple and was appointed to a royal temple. when King Rama I reign, While restored the temple, the old bell was found around the temple then King Rama I ordered moving the bell to Wat Phra Kaeo after that the king offered five bells to the temple and gave the new name “Wat Rakhang”. In the reign of King Rama IV, The temple has changed the name to “ Wat Rajkanthiyaram” but people still remembered the old name and call Wat Rakhang until now.

What is most interesting in the temple?

Wat Rakhangkhositaram

Desirable smiling buddha

       The buddha statue was built from Bronze and has an aspect in The attitude of meditation, The toward of the buddha has three monks prostrating and listening to Buddha’s sermon. The buddha was adored that Beautiful and invaluable. Once When King Rama V visited the temple, he said “Not any temple like this one, when stepped in the door of Buddhist temple, the buddha has a desirable smiling to the guest”. King Rama V offered the name  “Desirable smiling buddha” at the moment. Would you like to see How the buddha smile? come to visit the temple.

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Wat Rakhangkhositaram

How to behave when you visit Wat Rakhangkhositaram

       The regulation of Wat Rakhang is no different from other temples in Thailand, the prohibited dress is Short pants, short skirts, tight shirts, thin clothes, tank top, flip-flops, sleeveless shirt, and do not take the shirt outside of the pants. The cost of the Ticket is 20 baths per one, If you would like to visit the temple purchasing a ticket in front of the temple that the only way, The temple opens daily 08.00 AM – 5.00 PM.

For more information please contact 024182729, 024112255 

website: http://www.watrakang.com/ , https://www.facebook.com/watrakhang.official

Location: https://goo.gl/maps/u7PWUUDY3YF4LCni6

 

Wat Rakhangkhositaram

How to travel to Wat Rakhangkhositaram

Travel with the BTS sky train system and Chao Phraya Express Boat

             This is the best way to travel, the BTS sky train system can avoid the traffic jam in Bangkok and save your time. When you arrive at any BTS station that the station you would get off is “siam” and then walk to another side to wait for The Sukhumvit line after that get of at “Saphan Taksin (S6)” and walk to exit number 2, you can find Sathorn Pier of Chao Phraya Express Boat under the Bts station.

              Purchasing the ticket of an orange-flag boat, It has a cost 15 bath per one and then gets off Tha Chang Pier (N9), Walk from the pier and there have a ferries travel across the river, the fee is 4 bath per one, the ferries have round 10 – 15 minute. When you crossed the river,  the temple is near. You can check the cost of the train and boat through the link of the website below.

The starting point: BTS any Station

https://www.bts.co.th/eng/routemap.html, http://www.chaophrayaexpressboat.com/en/services/

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Wat Pathum, Bangkok

       Wat Pathum, the temple is between two shopping malls Siam Paragon and CentralWorld and the opponent the street of Siam Square, It is the most convenient to visit. It was established in 1857 by king Rama IV, The temple is a third class royal temple and it has the official name “Wat Pathum Wanaram Ratcha Wora Viharn”. The temple has a famous Place of meditation because it has many trees cover around the temple that seems located in the forest despite the temple is among the city however this is a surprisingly quiet place suiting for meditation.

Wat Pathum

Wat Pathum story

        His Majesty King Mongkut ordered the construction of this temple in 1857 to honor Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Somdej, and appointed Chao Phraya Borom Mahaphichaiyat as project leader, Phraya Sampopphai as construction supervisor, and invited monks from Wat Bowonniwet Vihara to serve as abbot. The building was finished in 1861, but the celebration was canceled because the queen died. As a result, the celebration was moved to December 21, 1867, for a five-night period.

Wat Pathum

       During the 2010 Ratchaprasong Intersection crackdown, Pathum Wanaram Temple was used as a “apocalyptic area” to take the wounded to safety. On May 19, 2010, one person was killed by a gunshot. According to eyewitnesses and autopsy results, all six died from high-velocity projectiles fired by soldiers stationed on rails at the BTS SkyTrain, which was located between Rama 1 Road and in front of Wat Pathum, according to the Southern Bangkok Criminal Court in 2013.

Wat Pathum

Phra Racha Sattha pavilion forest garden

       Wat Pathum Wanaram Ratchaworawihan It is well-known from the forest in the heart of the city. It is also known as the “Phra Racha Sattha pavilion forest garden” because it is densely forested. Until visitors could hardly see the tall buildings around them, as if they were standing in the middle of a forest. As a result, it is a place for meditation and dharma listening. In 2013, the temple was also awarded for outstanding architectural conservation. This temple is home to Phra Serm and Phra Saen, two ancient Buddhas in Vientiane’s Lan Xang art style. During King Mongkut’s reign, both Buddha forms were enshrined.

Wat Pathum

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How to behave when you visit Wat Pathum

       The regulation of the temple is no different from other temples in Thailand, the prohibited dress is Short pants, short skirts, tight shirts, thin clothes, tank top, flip-flops, sleeveless shirt, and do not take the shirt outside of the pants. There is no cost to visit the temple. The temple opens daily 07.00 AM – 6.00 PM. For more information please contact 0222516469 

Website http://watpathumwanaram.com/main/contact.php,

https://www.facebook.com/pathumwanaram.

Wat Pathum

How to travel to Wat Pathum

Travel with the BTS sky train system

       This is the best way to travel, the BTS sky train system can avoid the traffic jam in Bangkok and save your time. When you arrive at any BTS station that the station you would get off is “siam” and then walk to exit number 5 and walking strength, you will find the temple. You can check the cost of the train through the link on the website below.

The starting point: BTS Any Station

https://www.bts.co.th/eng/routemap.html,

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Wat Yannawa, Bangkok

       Wat Yannawa is one of Bangkok’s most stunning temples. Located in the Charoen Krung district, it is easily accessible and popular with tourists because it is a beautiful temple with a large Chinese Junk Chedi. People frequently come to make merit because it is convenient to walk along Charoen Krung Road from the foot of the Sathorn Bridge for about 5 minutes to the temple. A sign on Soi Charoen Krung 53, opposite the temple, and a sign at Wat Yan Nawa School indicate that you have arrived at Wat Yan Nawa. In addition, there are restaurants and clean restrooms within the temple that serve tourists.

Wat Yannawa

Wat Yannawa story

       The temple is a third-class royal temple, It was built in the Ayutthaya period and the previous name was “Wat Khok Khwai” which means “temple of the buffalo stable”. The temple changed the name again to “Wat Khok Krabue” in the Thonburi era, Later King Rama I had given the new name “Wat Yannawa” or “the boat temple” in English and order to make the Chinese junk vessel the true scale at the temple.

Wat Yannawa

The large Chinese Junk Chedi

       King Rama III forecast in the future a Chinese junk vessel would be disappeared that he order to build a Chinese junk vessel as the true scale with reinforced concrete. The  Chinese junk vessel Jedi composed of two Jedis replacing sparring. King Rama III knows that Chinese junk vessels using intensively for trade with China and believed that had brought prosperity to the Siam Kingdom.

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Wat Yannawa

How to behave at Wat Yannawa

       The regulation of the temple is no different from other temples in Thailand, the prohibited dress is Short pants, short skirts, tight shirts, thin clothes, tank top, flip-flops, sleeveless shirt, and do not take the shirt outside of the pants. There is no cost to visit the temple. The temple opens daily 06.00 AM – 6.00 PM. For more information please contact 026723216

Wat Yannawa

How to travel to Wat Yannawa

Travel with the BTS sky train system

             This is the best way to travel, the BTS sky train system can avoid the traffic jam in Bangkok and save your time. When you arrive at any BTS station that the station you would get off is “siam” and then walk to another side to wait for The Sukhumvit line after that get of at “Saphan Taksin (S6)” and walk to exit number 4, Walking strath on Charoen Krung Road around 12 minutes, you will meet the temple on the right-hand side.

The starting point: BTS Siam Station

https://www.bts.co.th/eng/routemap.html,

Address : 40 Charoenkrung Road, Yannawa, Sathorn, Bangkok

Location: https://goo.gl/maps/DmxmG1Jnp8E5RD3a9

Open for viewing: 05.00 a.m. – 10.00 p.m.

Tel : 0-2672-3216

Website : https://www.facebook.com/Wat Yannawa

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Wat Suthat (Wat Suthat Thepwararam)

       The Wat Suthat Thepwararam is close to Bangkok City Hall, the Giant Swing, and the Brahmin Church, Bamrung Muang Road, Tithong Road, Unakarn Road, and Soi Sa Song are the roads that surround the area on all four sides. The temple was constructed from King Rama I’s reign until it was completed. There are beautiful buildings as seen today, and it had passed into the reign of King Rama 3. Traveling to Wat Suthat is very convenient because the temple is located in the heart of the city, with many roads and close to important places. As a result, there are parking lots and buses that run along many lines. Because of the modern streets that first appeared during King Rama IV’s reign, the Giant Swing area was once considered one of Bangkok’s most prosperous communities. Wat Suthat is a popular temple for both Thai and foreign tourists. Many people come to visit because it is a beautiful temple that is easy to get to; today we will learn more about it.

Wat Suthat

Wat Suthat story

       Wat Suthat is a first-grade royal temple from the Rattanakosin era in Thailand. In 1807, King Rama I ordered the temple to be built and gave it the name “Wat Maha Sutthawat” for the first time. It is the location of Sri Sakyamuni and Setthamuni Buddha. The temple was not finished until King Rama III’s reign in 1848. UNESCO designated the temple as a World Heritage Site in 2005. There was a horror story that occurred during King Rama III’s reign, and you can see the painting on the temple’s wall, which depicts a PETA, which is a type of ghost in Buddhism, sleeping on the floor with many Monks considering the body. Locals believe a PETA has ever appeared near the temple because of the evidence on the wall. Wat Suthat also houses the ubosot (ordination hall) of Phra Buddha Trilokachet and the Sala Kan Parian of Phra Buddha Setthamuni (meeting hall).

What is most interesting in Wat Suthat ?

Wat Suthat

The giant swing

       King Rama I built the Giant Swing in front of the Devasathan shrine in 1784. The swing ceremony was discontinued during Rama II’s reign because the swing had been structurally damaged by thunderbolts. It was renovated and relocated to its current location in 1920 to make way for a gas plant. The ceremony was repeated until 1935, when it was canceled due to several fatal accidents.

      The last renovations were completed in 1959, and the wooden pillars were showing signs of serious damage after 45 years of exposure to the elements. In April 2005, major reconstruction began. Six teak tree trunks were used in this project. The two used for the swing’s main structure are over 3.5 m in circumference and over 30 m in height. The remaining four are 2.30 m in circumference and 20 m in height and are used for support. [1] The swing was removed in late October 2006, and the work was completed in December of the same year. The rebuilt swing was devoted in September 2007 during royal ceremonies presided over by King Bhumibol Adulyadej. The original swing’s timbers are housed in the Bangkok National Museum.  The Giant Swing, along with Wat Suthat, was proposed as a future UNESCO World Heritage site in 2005.

       There have two a Gian swing in Thailand, one is at Isuan Hall Nakhonsritammarat province and another at Toward of Wat Suthat Bangkok however The one at Bangkok has more famous than the other. A Gian swing has Thai name “Sao Chingcha”. It is a religious structure in Bangkok and the primary duty is Swinging Ceremony which is main purpose activity is to welcome the Shiva Deity. The merits of the activity are offered to the King. There has a historical record that Some men would swing well over 20 meters in the air. After several fatal accidents, the swing ceremony was canceled in the 1930s.

Wat Suthat

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Wat Suthat Thepwararam's Architecture

       The architecture of Wat Suthat Thepwararam is from the early Rattanakosin period, with influences from the Ayutthaya period as well. The viharn, the ubosot, and the viharn Kot, the Supreme Patriarch’s residence, comprise the architecture. This was the home of the 12th Patriarch, Somdej Phra Ariyawongsagatayara. There is also a pavilion, a floating pavilion, and a bell tower within the temple. With a width of 23.84 meters and a length of 26.35 meters, the viharn reflects the architecture of the early Rattanakosin period, which was influenced by Phra Viharn Mongkhon Bophit, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Province.

       The viharn’s roof is a two-story ancient Thai style decorated with colored glazed tiles. Blue bouquets, rooster leaves, and swan tails adorn the table. There are three carved wooden doors on each side of the temple, one in front and one behind it. It is said to be a masterpiece of King Rama II’s handiwork.

       Wat Suthat Thepwararam’s Ubosot It is thought to be Thailand’s longest ubosot. It was built during the reign of King Rama 3 and has a width of 22.60 meters and a length of 72.25 meters, and it houses the Buddha Trilokachet. Around the magnificent frescoes, the Buddha image in the subduing Mara posture, which is the main Buddha image in the ubosot, appears. The Ubosot’s most interesting feature is the glass wall in the north and south, which serves as a residence for the royal “sprinkling” ceremonies to the people.

Wat Suthat

Preta of Wat Suthat

       The temple, which dates back to the Rattanakosin Kingdom, was a location where myths about the undead were told. According to Buddhist and Siamese beliefs, preta are often depicted as a tall hungry ghost with a thin body and a frightening howling cry. It is said to appear frequently at night in front of the temple. Until it was stated that “Pret Wat Suthat” in conjunction with “Raeng Wat Saket” or “Wat Saket’s Vultures”

       However, it is assumed that what folks see as the preta of Wat Suthat stems from a misinterpretation of the Sao Chingcha, or Giant Swing, a towering Hindu structure that stands in front of the temple at night when there is no more light. Furthermore, one mural in this temple’s ordination hall depicts a painting of a preta lying on the ground to feed water to the monks.

Wat Suthat

How to Act When Visiting a Temple

       Wat Suthat’s regulations are similar to those of other Thai temples; the prohibited dress is
Short pants, short skirts, tight shirts, thin clothes, tank top, flip-flops, sleeveless shirt, and no shirt outside of the pants. The ticket costs 20 baths per person. The only way to visit the temple is to purchase a ticket in front of the temple. The temple is open daily from 8.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Wat Suthat

How to travel to Wat Suthat

       Take The MRT Blue Line and get of Sam Yot Station(BL30) and then walking to exit number three after that You can see Bangkok Bank and walk straight on Unakan road then you will meet the intersection and keep going straight, you can see the entrance of Wat Suthat School on the left-hand side and Wat Suthat. You can check the cost of the train through the link on the website below.

Address : 146 Bamrung Muang Road Sao Chingcha Subdistrict, Phra Nakhon District, Bangkok

Location: https://goo.gl/maps/DMXB1iZ8hxpHn2dK8

Open for viewing: 08:30 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Tel : 0-2622-2819

Website : https://www.facebook.com/WatSuthatBangkok/

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Wat Ratchabophit

       Wat Ratchabophit or Wat Ratchabophit Sathit Maha Simaram Ratcha Wora Maha Wihan is the temple of King Rama 5 and 7, which is located on Fueng Nakhon Road. It is a temple with Thai and European architecture that was established during the reign of King Rama V. The temple’s façade is Thai architecture, yet the interior is adorned in a western manner. The ubosot, viharn, chedi, and glass balcony are notable characteristics of Wat Ratchabophit. The Thai lacquer patterns are embellished with lovely pearls. Benjarong tiles are used to embellish many areas. The pagoda is ornamented with bell-shaped porcelain, and it is the final chedi built in accordance with historic traditions.

Wat Ratchabophit

Wat Ratchabophit History

       Wat Ratchabophit has the official name “Wat Ratchabophit Sathit Maha Simaram Ratcha Wora Maha Wihan”. The temple was built in the reign of King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) in 1869 (B.E. 2412). The temple is the residence of His Holiness the Supreme Patriarch of Thailand, it is a royal temple at the request of King Chulalongkorn (King Rama V). The Architecture of the temple has a Thai architecture style on the exterior and western architecture style inside, There is a relic of Buddha inside and the chedi was built in Sri Lankan style. Moreover, There have the Royal Cemetery On the west at the end of the temple. There had an important person came In 1984, the leader of the Catholic Church, Pope John Paul II visited the temple and again in 2019, Pope Francis had also come.

How to Behave when visiting Wat Ratchabophit

       The regulation of the temple is the same as other temples in Thailand, the prohibited dress is Short pants, short skirts, tight shirts, thin clothes, tank top, flip-flops, sleeveless shirt, and do not take the shirt outside of the pants. There is no cost to visit the temple. The temple opens daily 08.30 AM – 5.00 PM. For more information please contact 022223930.

What is most interesting in Wat Ratchabophit?

Wat Ratchabophit

       The Buddha inside ubosot has the name “Angkiirod buddha”, It’name came from one of the Buddha names. The name is mean “ radius spreading from the inside” and was Molded during the period of King Rama IV and King Rama V. Moreover The base of the buddha contains the ashes of King Rama ii, King Rama III, King Rama IV, and King Rama V. Do not miss to visit and worship the stunning golden buddha.

Wat Ratchabophit

How to travel?

Travel with Mrt and walking.

        Take The MRT Blue Line and get of Sam Yot Station(BL30) and then walking to exit number three after that walking straight along the Charoen Krung Road until finding four intersections and turn the right-hand side, you will meet the Fueang Nakhon road and across to the other side of the road, keep walking straight until meeting Krung Thai Bank, finally, you will meet Wat Ratchabophit temple. You can check the cost of the train through the link on the website below.

The starting point: MRT Sam Yot Station

https://metro.bemplc.co.th/Fare-Calculation?lang=en

Hotel near Wat Ratchabophit

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Wat Arun (Wat Chaeng)

          Wat Arun is another thing that springs to mind when we think of Bangkok is its stunning image. Today we will drive you to Wat Arun, Bangkok, which is located beautifully on the Chao Phraya River. Seeing the splendour of the temple and learning about the place’s origins and the mythology of the huge Wat Arun. Thai people believe that coming to Wat Arun to make merit and bringing food to the monks will make their lives “glory every night and day.” Wat Arun is a lovely temple located near the Chao Phraya River. As a result, it is a popular spot to visit in order to pray to Buddha, make merit, and take beautiful photographs. It is well-liked by both Thai and foreign tourists.

Wat Arun

The history of Wat Arun

Wat Arun has a full name as “Wat Arun Ratchawararam Ratchawaramahawihan”, if the English translation of Wat Arun is “Temple of Dawn.” When Taksin the Great constructed his new capital of Thonburi and arrived at the temple in the early morning, the king saw the first light of dawn reflected off the surface of the temple and gave the temple its name. Following that, he gave a new name to the temple, replacing the old name “Wat Makok” with “Wat Arun.” During Taksin’s reign, the temple was located on the grounds of the royal palace before his successor. After that, King Rama I moved the palace to the other side of the river. It has been dormant for a long time. The temple was not renovated until the reign of King Rama II. Later, in the reign of King Rama 3, a big pagoda with a height of 81.85 metres and a width of 234 metres was erected, but the pagoda was completed in the reign of King Rama IV. The temple was renamed “Wat Arun Ratchawararam” by King Rama IV. Later in the Rattanakosin era, King Rama IV was invited to the temple, and the royal ashes of King Rama 2 were packed. As a result, Wat Arun became King Rama II’s temple. Wat Arun has undergone recurrent repairs, the most recent of which began in September 2013 and was finished in 2017.

Wat Arun

Phraprang Wat Arun

Another popular tourist attraction in the temple is the Phra Prang, a massive Thai building consisting of the main pagoda and four secondary pagodas made of brick and stucco and embellished with stained glass, comparable to the large pagoda. The current Prang It was not the original Ayutthaya pagoda, but it was created to replace it during the reign of King Rama II in 1820 and was completed during the reign of King Rama III. It is 81.85 metres from the ground to the peak. Later, under the time of King Rama IV, it was extensively rebuilt, as seen now. The Phra Prang is composed of bricks and cement, and is adorned with shell pieces, glazed tiles, and various coloured benjarong bowls. It has floral, leaf, and other patterns, most of which are from China. The Wat Arun Phraprang It is also one of Thailand’s tourist emblems.

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Wat Arun

The Legend of Wat Arun the Giant

Wat Arun is the home of two giants: the giant above the white body known as “Sahatsadecha” and the giant beneath the green body known as “Tosakan.” They were composed of plaster and embellished with coloured glazed tiles in lovely clothing patterns. They are frequently seen standing watch at the temple’s entrance. People used to believe that the giant protecting the temple had the power to drive away spirits, ghosts, and demons, and so had a duty to preserve the sacred items within the temple. The legends of the Wat Arun and Wat Pho giants, It originated at one of Thailand’s most well-known locations, “Tha Tian.” The word “Tian” means nothing in the area. The territory of Tha Tian became desolate as a result of the struggle between the giants Wat Arun and Wat Pho (Wat Phra Chetuphon Wimonmangkalaram Rajaworawihan). As a result, the two giants trampled the trees in the region until they died, resulting in a completely flat plain.

Wat Arun

What is the best way to travel?

Use the BTS sky train system and the Chao Phraya Express Boat to get about.

The BTS sky train system, which can avoid traffic bottlenecks in Bangkok and save you time, is the best way to commute. When you arrive at any BTS station, depart at “Siam” and travel to the other side to wait for the Sukhumvit line, then out at “Saphan Taksin (S6) and walk to exit number 2, where you can discover the Sathorn Pier of the Chao Phraya Express Boat under the BTS station.

Purchasing a ticket for an orange-flag boat, which costs 15 bath per person, and then departing from Tha Tien Pier (N8), Walk from the pier and there are ferries that travel across the river to the Maharaj pier; the charge is 4 bath per person, and the ferries run every 10 – 15 minutes. The temple is close to where you crossed the river. You can find out how much the train and boat will cost by clicking on the website link below.

The starting point: BTS Siam Station

https://www.bts.co.th/eng/routemap.html,

http://www.chaophrayaexpressboat.com/en/services/

How to Behave when visiting a Temple

Short pants, short skirts, tight shirts, thin clothes, tank top, flip-flops, sleeveless shirt, and do not take the shirt outside of the pants are prohibited, as are short pants, short skirts, tight shirts, thin clothes, tank top, flip-flops, sleeveless shirt, and do not take the shirt outside of the pants.

Booking hotels near Wat Arun

Additional benefit information

The admission costs 50 baths per person. The only option to see the temple is to purchase a ticket in front of the temple.

The temple is open everyday from 8.30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

contact 028912185, 024663167, or 024657742 for additional information.

Address : Wang Doem Road, Wat Arun Subdistrict, Bangkok Yai District, Bangkok

Location: https://goo.gl/maps/AT7UPtGxyrKMs4sr8

Website : https://www.facebook.com/watarunofficial

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