Tag Archives: Thai street food

Khao Tom Mud, Thai dessert

       Khao Tom Mud (Coconut Sticky Rice with Banana Filling) is a popular Thai dessert that few people are unfamiliar with. The dessert is both useful and nutritious, and the ingredients are easily available locally. It is also a dessert that uses flavored rice, which is the staple food of Thai people. It is possible to consider “Khao Tom Mud” to be one of Thai ancestors’ local wisdom. Khao Tom Mud is also one of the desserts that Thais enjoy offering to monks and using in merit events on a regular basis. It’s inexpensive, simple to obtain, and aids in stomach filling. If you visit Thailand, don’t miss out on tasting this sweet and delicious Thai dessert.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud's Story

       “Khao Tom Mud” or “Khao Tom Phad” is a sticky rice and coconut milk dessert. The banana filling is then wrapped in banana leaves or young coconut leaves and steamed until cooked. In the south, sticky rice with coconut milk wrapped in banana leaves is known as “Hor Tom,” and if wrapped in coconut leaves and tied with a rope, it is known as “Hor Mud.” The dessert is similar to Khao Tom Mud, which is also found in other countries. In the Philippines, for example, it is known as “Ibos or Suman” and it, like Khao Tom Mud, is classified into several varieties. Another type of Khao Tom Mud is “Khao Tom Luk Yod,” which is a dessert served at the end of Buddhist Lent. It is wrapped in an oval shape from coconut or bay leaf, covering glutinous rice mixed with black beans without filling, tied together in a bunch, and cooked. Another dish from the south is “Khao Tom Mud Tai,” which is boiled rice wrapped and tied with golden beans pounded with coriander root, garlic, pepper, pork, lard, seasoned with salt, water, and sugar, wrapped in banana leaves into sticks, tied into 4-5 pieces, and boiled. The northeastern region refers to Khao Tom Mud as Khao Tom Kluay, which is wrapped in raw sticky rice and seasoned with a pinch of salt. Add the boiled peanuts, mix them together, then wrap them in bundles, then add the banana fillings and bring to a boil until they are cooked. If it’s a fried recipe, it will first stir-fry sticky rice with coconut milk before wrapping it in banana filling and boiling it. If you want a sweet taste, dip it in sugar before eating.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

       In Laos, there is also Khao Tom Mud, which is called “Khao Tom” if the salty filling is made with lard and mung bean paste and “Khao Tom” if the sweet filling is made with bananas. There is also a similar dessert called “Khao Tom Yuan,” which is similar to Khao Tom Mud but is wrapped larger and cooked by boiling before being eaten. It is cut into small pieces and tossed with grated coconut, salt, and sugar before being eaten. The last one is Khao Tom Mud, which is cooked in the Bok sub-district of Srisaket province. The dessert is twice as long as normal Khao Tom Mud, but it is still wrapped in banana leaves and made with glutinous rice in three colors: black glutinous rice, red glutinous rice, and normal glutinous rice, as well as bananas and black beans, and it can also be filled with corn. In 2014, the Ministry of Culture’s Department of Cultural Promotion designated Khao Tom Mud as an intangible cultural heritage in the field of knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe in order to prevent its extinction.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud's religious beliefs

       According to Buddhist legend, the Lord Buddha wishes to appease his mother because he died 7 days after his birth and was reborn as a god in the Dusit heaven. As a result, in the seventh year following his enlightenment, the Buddha ascended to live in the Daowadung heaven. Preach the Abhidhamma Pitaka and please the Buddha’s mother for one year, until he descended from the Daowadung heaven and settled in Sangkassa. Many people flocked to see Lord Buddha in order to offer food and other items to him, causing some people to be unable to enter the alms bowl. As a result, they created Khao Tom and threw them into the Buddha’s alms bowl. And it was said that before throwing, the townspeople prayed that their Khao Tom would fall into the bowl rather than hitting the Buddha, which was the origin of the phrase “Khao Tom Luk Yod.”

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

       Thais typically bring Khao Tom Mud to offer to monks during the merit events ceremony on the last day of Buddhist Lent, also known as the Tak Bat Devo ceremony. The reason Thais liked to bring Khao Tom Mud to offer to the monks was because they believed, according to legend in the Buddha’s time, that the city people who came to wait for the Lord Buddha in the Buddha’s time to make merit and offer food to monks because it was convenient and easy to eat. Some people claimed that it was customary to bring khao Tom Mud to make offerings to monks because it was used as supplies for traveling to spread Buddhism in distant places. Khao Tom Mud is more than just a snack; it also has cultural values, which are the cultural roots of Thai people.

       Furthermore, in the past, rice porridge was given as a symbol of a couple. Because Khao Tom Mud will appear to be bringing two desserts to tie together. They believe that if young people make merit with Khao Tom Mud on the Buddhist Lent day, their love will be good and their married life will last forever, just like Khao Tom Mud. People used to make Khao Tom Mud to give to monks on the last day of Buddhist Lent.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud Ingredients

1 kg glutinous rice

-1/2 cup black beans, cooked

-3 quarts coconut milk

–2 teaspoons salt

-A leaf of pandanus

1 cup sugar plus 1/2 cup

-10-15 bananas that are ripe (or other fillings of your choice)

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Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud wrapping equipment

-banana leaves

-Hammered and soaked in water for 2-3 hours to soften (or rope)

-steamer

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Khao Tom Mud

1. Soak the black beans overnight, then steam until tender.

2. Thoroughly wash the glutinous rice (about twice) and soak it in water for 4 hours before scooping it up and draining it.

3. In a medium-high heat pan, combine the coconut milk and pandan leaves. When the coconut milk begins to boil, remove the pandan leaves and season with salt and sugar.

4. Remove from the heat and stir in the sticky rice and coconut milk. Stir-fry for about 15 minutes, or until the glutinous rice begins to dry, then set aside to cool.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

5. Peel and cut the bananas in half before preparing them. Tear the banana leaves into two pieces. Place the banana leaves with the light colored side facing each other, large leaves on the outside and small leaves on the inside.

6. Scoop about 1 tablespoon glutinous rice onto a banana leaf with a spoon and flatten the glutinous rice. Place the banana in the center and cover it once more with sticky rice. Then top it with black beans.

7. Then tightly wrap and fold the banana leaf and tie it with a peg or rope. Do everything.

8. Place the steamed rice in a crate. Steam for 20 minutes on high heat, then remove it from the steamer and place it on a serving plate.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud Nutrition

Khao Tom Mud provides energy and nutrients.

Whole grain porridge contains 183 calories, 2.5g protein, 38g carbohydrates, and 2.3g fat per 100g.

Khao Tom Mud’s Nutritional Advantages

– Glutinous rice is a type of carbohydrate. Give the body energy, give the body warmth.

– Bananas are carbohydrates that provide energy to the body. They also provide warmth, allowing the body to perform various activities effectively.

– Salt is a carbohydrate that gives the body energy. It provides warmth, allowing the body to perform a variety of tasks effectively. The solubility of the substance affects digestion, absorption, and how much it can be used.

-Proteins are found in black beans or peanuts, followed by fats, minerals, and vitamins. Assist the body in growing by, for example, assisting in the formation of cells and tissues. including the replacement of worn organ parts. It is the chemical component that gives it the ability to resist disease and provide energy when carbohydrate intake is insufficient. A gram of protein contains 4 calories.

– Sugar is a carbohydrate that provides energy to the body. It also provides warmth, which allows the body to perform various activities well.

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Khai Luk Khoei, Thai food

       Son-in-law eggs, also known as Khai Luk Khoei, are a classic Thai delicacy. Hard-boiled eggs, sugar, fish sauce, shallots, chile peppers, tamarind pulp, and cilantro sprigs are used to make this dish. Hard-boiled eggs are peeled and cooked in hot oil before being removed to cool. The sauce is then made in the same pan using shallot oil, fish sauce, tamarind pulp, water, and sugar until it reaches a somewhat thick consistency. The eggs are then split in half and put on a dish with the sauce drizzled over them.

Khai Luk Khoei (son-in-law eggs), Thai food, Thailand

Khai Luk Khoei's story

      Khai Luk Khoei (son-in-law eggs), It is a Thai dish made with tamarind juice, palm sugar, and fried eggs as the major ingredients. This article will provide insight into the dish’s origins. It is believed that there was a household with a mother-in-law who prepared dishes with a lot of raw neem, which grows quickly and is easy to come by, especially during the rainy season. She served the neem with grilled fish and a sweet fish sauce as a side dish. The son-in-law who lived in the same house, on the other hand, disliked grilled fish and neem. As a result, the son-in-law decided to experiment with a new sweet fish sauce recipe. He was hunting for an alternative to grilled fish and came across a boiled egg. He first tried it with sweet fish sauce. The taste of boiled eggs and sweet fish sauce couldn’t possibly go together. As a result, he tried to change it by frying boiled eggs and eating them with sweet fish sauce, which turned out to be quite nice, and later he added fried onions that he had on hand, which made the new recipe even more delectable.

Khai Luk Khoei (son-in-law eggs), Thai food, Thailand

        Only palm sugar and tamarind juice are used in Khai Luk Khoei, and the tamarind juice may have a somewhat salty aftertaste. Which we can see is comparable to the Pad Thai sauce that we used to eat, which is regarded as the distinct flavor of many Thai foods. Aside from fried shallots, there are side dishes that cut through the tamarind juice’s acidic and sweet flavors, as well as palm sugar. The appeal of a dish that must have all three flavors: spicy, sour, and sweet is sprinkled on top with fried dried chilies. At this time, Khai Luk Khoei is not only made from chicken eggs, but also from boiling duck eggs, which are more delectable with egg white flesh and a huge egg yolk when cooked since duck eggs are denser than chicken eggs. Khai Luk Khoei is a must-have on practically every Thai restaurant’s menu, alongside fried eggs and kai pa-loh.

Khai Luk Khoei (son-in-law eggs), Thai food, Thailand

Ingredients for Khai Luk Khoei

Deep-frying oil made from vegetables

8 peeled hard-boiled or medium-boiled eggs

1 tablespoon of fried shallot oil plus 1/2 cup of fried shallots

1/4 cup packed light or dark brown sugar, or 1/2 cup shredded palm sugar.

1/4 cup fish sauce

2 tblsp. tamarind juice

3 tablespoons of water.

For garnish, 2 fresh red Thai long chilies or 1/2 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced lengthwise.

Garnish with fresh cilantro leaves.

Khai Luk Khoei (son-in-law eggs), Thai food, Thailand

Khai Luk Khoei: How to Cook It

1. In a wok or deep skillet, pour the vegetable oil to a depth of 3 inches and heat it to 325°F to 350°F. Stick an uncoated wooden chopstick into the oil to see whether it’s ready without a thermometer; when the oil is hot enough, a constant stream of tiny bubbles will rise from the chopstick’s tip. Place a baking sheet next to the stove, lined with paper towels.

2. When the oil is hot, gently drop in 4 eggs and cook, swirling occasionally to maintain even browning, for about 3 minutes, or until thoroughly and evenly browned. Transfer the eggs to the towel-lined baking sheet using a slotted spoon and set aside to cool. Carry on with the remaining 4 eggs in the same manner. Allow it to cool to room temperature.

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Khai Luk Khoei (son-in-law eggs), Thai food, Thailand

3. To create the sauce, heat the shallot oil, sugar, fish sauce, tamarind, and water in a 1-quart saucepan over medium heat. Bring the mixture to a low boil, continually stirring. Check the consistency of the fluid once the sugar has completely dissolved. The consistency should be similar to warm pancake syrup. Reduce it a little more if it’s too thin. If it’s too thick, thin it out with a little more water. Remove the pan from the heat once the correct consistency has been attained.

4. Slice the deep-fried eggs in half lengthwise and put the halves, cut sides up, on a serving tray while the sauce is still warm. Over the eggs, pour the heated sauce, and sprinkle the shallots on top. Serve garnished with chilies and cilantro.

Khai Luk Khoei (son-in-law eggs), Thai food, Thailand

Nutrition for Khai Luk Khoei

       Nutritional Information, Calories, Energy and Nutrients in 1 serving of egg-in-law has total energy 155 kcal, protein 12.6 g, carbohydrate 1.1 g, fat 10.6 g.

The following are the advantages of Khai Luk Khoei:

1. Egg whites are high in protein, which helps to strengthen muscles and organs.

2. Vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin B12, and choline aid in nourishing the eyes, skin, nerves, and brain, all of which help to boost memory.

5. Iron is necessary for red-blood cell production.

6. Zinc helps to improve the immune system and prevent colds.

7. Tamarind contains vitamin C, which aids iron absorption. and more effectively used to determine whether school-aged children should consume adequate amounts of these nutrients, Fresh fruits and vegetables should also be consumed.

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Lod Chong, Thai dessert

        Green noodles, sweetened coconut milk, and crushed ice make up Lod Chong, a simple Thai treat. It’s extremely popular because it’s a light and refreshing dessert that goes well with a spicy supper. It is available from a variety of street food sellers at a fair price and is easy to locate. Traditional Lod Chong and Lod Chong Singapore are the two types of dessert, however they are extremely similar. “Cendol,” an iced sweet dish made of green rice flour jelly, coconut milk, and palm sugar syrup, is the dessert’s origin. Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, Singapore, and Myanmar are among the countries where it is popular. Additional toppings, such as diced jackfruit, sweetened red azuki beans, or durian, could be used in addition to the green jelly.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong story

       The origins of “Cendol” are unknown, but it is a popular sweet drink throughout Southeast Asia. Cendol may have begun life as Dawet in Java, Indonesia, according to one theory. The Javanese name “Dawet” was first mentioned in a manuscript written in Surakarta, Central Java, in the early nineteenth century by Serat Centhini between 1814 and 1823. According to an Indonesian academic, a Dawet sweet drink was mentioned in the Kresnayana manuscript, which dates from the Kediri Kingdom in Java around the 12th century. Dawet refers to the entire concoction of Cendol green jellies, which are often produced with weren sagoo or rice flour, coconut milk, and liquid gula jawa in Java (palm sugar syrup). An Indonesian historian claims that in ancient Java’s rice agriculture society, sagoo or rice flour was employed as a sweet beverage ingredient. Cendol jellies and their variants are, in fact, a rural agricultural product that is still made in Javanese communities. Dawet is typically served without ice in Banjarnegara, Central Java. However, today, ice cubes or shaved ice are frequently added to this dessert beverage.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Cendol, on the other hand, has evolved in different ways across the globe. Cendol is a term used in Indonesia to describe “green pandan jelly served in coconut milk,” with pandanus leaves or jackfruit chunks occasionally added. Unlike Cendol in Malaysia and Singapore, where other ingredients like as sweetened red beans and sweet corn are blended in like an es campur, this is not the case. Cendol is frequently served with ice, which may have evolved when ice became more widely available. It’s possible that it started in Malayan port cities like Malacca and Penang, where British refrigerated ships could provide the necessary ice.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Dawet or Cendol is an element of the traditional Javanese wedding ceremony, according to Javanese tradition. A day before the wedding, during the Midodareni ritual, the Dodol Dawet (Javanese meaning “selling Dawet”) is conducted. The parents would sell Dawet to the invited guests and relatives after the siraman bridal shower. The guests paid the Dawet with terracotta coins, which would later be handed to the bride as a symbol of the family’s wealth. The symbolic meaning was the parents’ wish for a large number of guests at the upcoming wedding, “as many as the Cendol jellies being sold.” Dawet street hawkers with pikulan (baskets carried with a balance rod) are widespread in Javanese cities, as seen in this antique shot from around 1935.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       The Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture has designated five Cendol-making traditions as intangible cultural assets in the country. In 2010 and 2018, Yogyakarta province recognized three Dawet (Javanese counterpart of Cendol) customs. Dawet, Dawet Camcau, and Dawet sambel are the names of the three creatures. Cendol was recognized in West Java province in 2016, while Es cendol was approved in Riau Islands province in 2020. The Malaysian Department of National History has designated cindol as a Malaysian heritage cuisine.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong in Thailand

       “Khanom Nok Poloi or Lod Chong Thai” is mentioned in a stone inscription from the Sukhothai period, referring to a ceremony that featured four types of Thai desserts at the time, including frog eggs (basil seeds), Nok Poloi (Lod Chong), Nang Loi (Khao Tok), and Ai Tue (Glutinous Rice) served with coconut milk. Nowadays, Lod Chong is frequently prepared for prestigious events because Thais believe that the name of the dessert, which means “survive,” will protect them from any dangers. Mr. Kitiphum Duangthip, the head pastry chef of Chitralada Palace, explained how to prepare Thai Lod Chong in the ancient times using milled rice. The rice was first soaked in lime water overnight before being milled with pandan leaves. Then combine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl and sprinkle over the dessert.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       A slender head and a big middle are the best features of Lod Chong. This can be accomplished by churning the dough until it gets sticky before scooping it onto the cylinder and sifting it through the slit. Flour through the cavity will remain, some will drip down gradually, not flowing into a stream (Lod Chong flour is excessively fluid), and how to press the Lod Chong flour through the cavity which has to press and loosen do not press all at once because it will cause the flour through the channel to form a long line. The space between the lod chong press mold and the water surface below, on the other hand, must be large enough for the powder to be ripped down. If the chasm is narrow, when the dough is pressed, the face of the glasses is too close to the surface of the water, the dough will not be broken, and it will flow together in a long line, giving Lod Chong an unattractive appearance.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand
Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong Singapore

       “Cinema” was the inspiration for Lod Chong Singapore. When Thailand still had popular movie theaters like the King, Queen, Grand, Chalermkhet, ChalermThai, Paramount, and Krung Kasem, another cinema on Yaowarat Road, which eventually changed its name to “Chalermburi Cinema,” was another less popular option. The genesis of the Singapore Lod Chong comes from the kitchen of the business “Singapore Food,” a restaurant that had been around for almost 60 years, located at Mo Mee intersection, opposite UOB Bank, Charoen Krung Road, in the region not far from the Singapore cinema, while it was still a Singapore cinema. As a result, young men and women from that era frequently socialize before heading to the Singapore theater to view a film. It is frequently served with Lod Chong, and from the phrase “Lod Chong in front of the Singapore cinema,” it evolved into “Lod Chong Singapore,” which it is today.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

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Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       In Chinatown, Lod Chong is a modest eatery. The restaurant is operated by a family, the family recipes are often kept secret, and the menu is fairly tiny, as are many other eateries in Chinatown. The menu at Lod Chong Singapore is simple: Lod Chong. The Lod Chong is served in a large drinking glass with crushed ice and that lovely sweet sweetness, unlike other eateries. Lod Chong Singapore is distinguished by two characteristics. To begin with, the Lod Chong they provide is considerably sweeter than many others in Bangkok, which attracts a large number of customers. Second, it is quite inexpensive. It will only set you back 22 THB for a glass of ice-cold Lod Chong.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to Pick the Right Pandan Leaves

       The leaves of a good fragrant pandan should be aromatic, thin, glossy, and light green with thorns. Trying not to crush the leaves while smelling them. The fragrant Pandan differs from typical Pandan leaves in that the edges of the leaves are smooth, without thorns, and dark green, unlike pandanus, which is light green. To obtain the lovely hue of Lod chong, Fragrant Pandan should select to use ancient leaves. However, in rural places, Lod chong is commonly prepared in two colors: green and white (without pandan leaves).

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Coconut milk for Thai Lod Chong

       In Lod Chong, excellent sugar is required for coconut milk. Using pandan leaves ripped and knotted into pieces, dissolve jaggery or coconut sugar and coconut milk in a pan. Wait until the sugar has completely dissolved and is bubbling. So, add the coconut milk, but not the water from the white grated coconut, stir rapidly and thoroughly, wait until the sugar boils again, and then turn off the heat. Don’t let it fall apart. Filter it through a fine white cloth, set it aside to cool, then bake candle smoke for 3 hours until aromatic, then serve with Lod Chong.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Sappaya sugar plam

      Furthermore, when adding famous ingredients such as “Sappaya sugar plam,” which is the best jaggery produced by the people of the central region, the traditional Thai Rod Chong becomes even more delectable. When it comes to jaggery, we always miss Phetchaburi sugar, but residents in the central area, such as Sing Buri, Suphan Buri, Chainat, and Uthai Thani, know that palm sugar must only come from Sappaya district in Chainat province. Sappaya palm sugar is distinguished by its appearance, which is widely used as a splicing. An old Thai dessert maker confirms that this sugar has a hard feel when freshly stirred. It will soften if you leave it alone for a while. The Sappaya sugar plam smelled sweet like real sugar from the palm tree, with a hint of smoke, and lingered in your mouth for a long time, leaving a final taste of fresh cow’s milk on the tongue. The sugar has a strong, sweet, somewhat salty flavor that is not as astringent or bitter as regular jaggery. Coconut milk will have an excellent taste and will not be oily when used to create it in Lod Chong. Because many palm trees were taken down and sugar producers limited their quantities, expansive sugar is now difficult to come by. However, if you know the source, you can still purchase it, which must be scheduled throughout the year.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong Ingredients

1 3/4 cup flour made from rice

1/4 cup tapioca starch

2 tbsp. arrowroot flour, ground

6 cups lime water

600 g of fresh green pandan leaves, sliced

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to use lime water

2 cups of water to 1 tablespoon of new red lime is the ratio to use. Allow it to float until it becomes clear before scooping it up and using it.

A coconut milk concoction

300 g of coconut cream (no water added).

Coconut milk (200 grams)

500 g sappaya palm sugar

3 pandan leaves (fresh)

candles made in the oven.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Lod Chong

1. Blend pandan leaves and lime juice together until fine, then filter off all but the water and split them into two parts: 4 cups and 2 cups.

2. Combine all three types of flour in a mixing bowl, then pour in the first half of the pandan juice. To form a smooth ball, knead by hand. Slowly pour the remaining pandan juice into the first section, kneading the mixture with your hands until the flour is completely dissolved. Put it in a metal pan after filtering it with a thin white cloth.

3. Place the pan on a medium heat setting. Continuously whisk with a spatula until the dough thickens. The second part is added and mixed in pandan juice.

Mix until the mixture is clear and sticky (takes about 20-30 minutes). In cold water, press the flour using the Lod Chong press mold. Set aside for 15 to 20 minutes in the water. To drain the water, scoop it up and drain it in a strainer. Steamed taro, melons, coconut milk, and ice flakes are served on the side.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Nutrition of Lod Chong

It has 137.51 kcal of energy. 4.41 g of fat, 1.01 g of protein. 23.98 grams of carbohydrates, 0.16 grams of fiber.

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Kanom Sai Sai, Thai dessert

        Khanom Sai Sai, also known as Kanom Sot Sai, is a traditional Thai dessert. It has a sweet, delicious taste and a soft, chewy texture. It is stuffed with sweet coconut filling and wrapped in banana leaves, which gives it a natural aroma. Anyone who gets a taste will be hooked. People used to eat some because there were hawker stalls selling it, but it was a difficult cooking process, and the new generation does not like eating Thai desserts. As a result, few people are familiar with the dessert’s appearance and flavor. Khanom Sai Sai is a Thai dessert that is served at auspicious events, most notably the engagement ceremony, which includes a parade of Khan Mak on their way to pick up the bride. A Khanom Sai Sai is one of nine Thai desserts that are served during an engagement ceremony.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

The story of Khanom Sai Sai

       Khanom Sai Sai is a Thai dessert that was once used in Khan Mak ceremonies. It is commonly served as a dessert at weddings. Khanom Sai Sai must stuff with two fillings and produce with an even number because the ancient era believed that if there is only one filling and a single number, newlyweds will be separated from each other for a long time. As a result, if the dessert is used in a wedding ceremony, two fillings must be combined, implying that the couple is in love, harmonious, and will be together for a long time. Nowadays, the dessert is rarely seen in a wedding ceremony because the new generation does not believe in old traditions like the ancients. As a result, it is not commonly used in auspicious events, as it was by the ancient people in the past.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Khanom Sai Sai is wrapped in banana leaves and tied in a tall shape with Tiao (Tiao is coconut-palm leaf stalk). The recipe has several important components: first, the filling is fragrant and sweet, second, there is a salty taste with a fresh coconut milk topping, and the top layer is thick enough but not messy. Nowadays, it is difficult to find delicious Khanom Sai Sai that are both fragrant and sweet because the recipe calls for fresh and thickened coconut milk, which is now quite expensive and a good quality ingredient that is difficult to find.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

Ingredients for Khanom Sai Sai

• 2+1/2 cup shredded coconut

•1+1/2 cup coconut palm sugar

• Warm water

• a scented candle used to smoke sweetmeats

• 2 tbsp glutinous rice flour

• one-third cup cold water (or pandan juice, chilled butterfly pea juice to add color)

• one-third cup rice flour

• 2 tsp kosher salt

• 3+1/3 cup coconut milk

 

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

Khanom Sai Sai wrapping supplies

Khanom Sai Sai wrapping supplies

• Banana peels

• Leaves of coconut

• skewers made of wood

Make the banana leaves.

1. Cut the banana leaves into two pieces, one large sheet about 5X9 centimeters in size and one small sheet about 4X6 centimeters in size.

2. Make a triangle out of the head end. Wipe both sides clean and set them aside to dry in the sun for a few moments. (to prevent the banana leaf from breaking while wrapping the dessert)

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Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

Prepare Khanom Sai Sai filling ingredients.

1. Combine grated coconut and coconut sugar in a mixing bowl. In a pan over low heat, the water is boiled until the mixture becomes sticky and dry. Take it off the heat and set it aside to cool completely.

2. When the mixture has completely cooled, shape it into a ball about 1 inch in diameter and place it in a covered container.

3. Prepare the filling mixture for baking with candle smoke.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

making Khanom Sai Sai dough.

making Khanom Sai Sai dough.

Knead the glutinous rice flour in cold water until it forms a ball. Then shape it into a round ball the size of the coconut’s face. Make the necessary preparations.

Ingredients for Khanom Sai Sai topping

In a mixing bowl, combine rice flour, salt, and coconut milk until combined. Pour into a brass (or Teflon) pan and stir over medium heat until thick and boiling all over. Remove it from the heat and set it aside to cool.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to Prepare Khanom Sai Sai Wrapped in Banana Leaves

1. Spread the molded glutinous rice flour into thin sheets (enough to completely cover the filling), then pick up the filling in the center and completely cover the dough. Place the dessert on top of the banana leaves that have been stacked.

2. Place a large banana leaf (soft side up) on top of a small banana leaf. Put the filling in place. Then, on top of the filling, spoon about 1/2 teaspoon of the topping.

3. Form a tall shape out of a banana leaf. Tie and fasten the prepared coconut leaves with a wooden skewer. Make the loins long enough by cutting the ends diagonally. In the steamer, place the dessert wrappers.

4. Steam the snacks for about 10 minutes in a steaming set over simmering water. Remove it from the heat.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

The advantages of Khanom Sai Sai

Khanom Sai Sai provides energy and nutrients.

136 kcal/piece of energy content

Carbohydrate-rich recipes help to nourish the blood and make the body work more efficiently. aids in the prevention of degenerative diseases, cancer, paralysis, heart disease, and high blood pressure. Furthermore, it can lower cholesterol, narrow blood vessels, alleviate gout and migraine symptoms, relieve stress, and aid in sleep. Menstrual pain is a golden age problem that must be solved.

Precautions to Take When Consuming Khanom Sai Sai

This menu is not suitable for diabetics due to its high sugar content. should be consumed in an appropriate quantity.

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Kanom Chan, Thai dessert

       Kanom Chan (Steamed Layer Cake) is a classic Thai dish that has been a part of Thai culture since the Sukhothai period. The original layered dessert has a layered pattern of light white layer cakes and is green from the hue of pandan leaves. It has a lovely shape and a delectable taste and aroma of pandan leaves to whet your appetite. It is frequently used by Thais on many important occasions. It doesn’t matter if it’s a wedding ceremony, a blessing ritual for a new home, or daily offerings for the monks. It is also a favorite Thai dessert that Thais can enjoy at every celebration because it is simple to prepare and can be purchased almost anywhere.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

Background information on Kanom Chan

       Kanom Chan can be found in a number of Southeast Asian nations, including Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia, Indonesia, and Vietnam. In Malaysia, Kanom Chan is Kueh Lapis, which is a Chinese treat made from rice flour, tapioca flour, and rice flour, such as cakes, egg buns, and so on. This delicacy is popular in Malaysia and Singapore during the Chinese New Year and Hari Raya. Malaysia received this dessert tradition from Indonesia, which was inspired by the Dutch, who ruled Indonesia at the time. The dish was steamed instead than baked, as this is a more popular cooking method in the country. As a result, the layer cake is known as “Steamed layer cake” in English.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Lapis Legit, or Spiku, is a Dutch-influenced delicacy popular in Indonesia. It’s a popular Indonesian delicacy with a Dutch name of “Spekkoek.” Because Koek means cake and Spek means pig belly, the name could have been understood as a layered face resembling pork belly or bacon. This snack is thought to be the first of its kind to come from Germany. We can see that there is a German delicacy called Baumkuchen that appears similar to Spekkoek, but it does not have a chocolate coating. A traditional dessert with a lot of spice is lapis legit. However, for those who are allergic to strong spices, other options are now available. As a result, the recipe can be tweaked to include vanilla, pandan, chocolate, raisins, and prunes in place of spice, or chocolate powder, vanilla essence, pandan flavor, or chopped dried fruit.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

       In Thailand, Kanom Chan was obvious evidence when it arrived, but the Dutch dominated Indonesia from 1800 to 1942, roughly throughout the reigns of Rama 1 and Rama VIII of Thailand, demonstrating that this dessert did not exist during the Ayutthaya period or Krung Thon Buri. Kanom Chan is a type of pastry that can be classed as semi-dry, semi-wet, or non-hard. Because Kanom Chan denotes hierarchy, it was once often used to honor festivals. As a result, Thai people used to make Kanom Chan with up to nine layers because they believed that the number “9” (Kao in Thai signifies prosperity) would allow them to “advance” in their job obligations. In terms of Siam’s historical documentation, which cites the oldest sweets discovered, the gourmet cooks’ cookbook from King Rama V’s era revealed that the Siamese were already familiar with Kanom Chan during his reign. Furthermore, Phraya Anuman Ratchathon “Sathian Koset” (14 December 1888 – 12 July 1969, 5th Land of Rama V – Rama 9) claimed that Kanom Chan was still included in a set of wedding ceremony delicacies (Khan Mak ceremony).

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

Kanom Chan's main ingredients

-4 cups coconut milk

-2 1/2 cups of granulated sugar

-1 1/2 cups of mung bean flour

-1/2 cup concentrated pandan juice

-1/2 cup rice flour

-1/2 cup tapioca starch

-1/2 cup jasmine artificial flavoring mixed with water

-Bakedware with a rectangular shape, such as a rectangular baking pan or a rectangular baking pan (size 10×10 inches or 8×8 inches)

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KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Kanom Chan

-In a pot, combine the sugar and coconut milk. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly, for about 5 minutes, or until the sugar dissolves (no need to wait for boiling). Remove the pan from the heat and set it aside to cool. For around 15 minutes, steam the tray or type in a steamer set with boiling water.

-Combine the rice flour, tapioca starch, and mung bean flour in a mixing bowl, then slowly pour in the coconut milk mixture. Knead the dough with your hands until it is smooth and uniform. Knead the dough for about 15 minutes, or until it does not clump. Then strain it through a sieve.

-Divide the flour into two cups, one containing pandan juice and the other containing jasmine juice. Prepare by mixing everything together.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

-Pour the white mixture into the first layer. (Pour about 1/3 cup of the mixture into each layer) into the mold, cover the lid, steam for 5 minutes, open the lid, pour the green mixture into the pan, close the lid, steam for 5 minutes, repeat. Alternate layers until all of the dough has been used up, perhaps 9-10 layers total, with the final layer steaming for around 7 minutes before being removed from the steamer. Allow it to cool completely before serving (about 3 hours).

-Take Kanom Chan out of the tray. In a bowl of boiling water, soak the knife. Cut the Kanom Chan into pieces with your hands, arrange them on a platter, and serve.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

Kanom Chan nutrition

Nutrition information, calories, energy and nutrients. 100g layered snack contains 99 kcal, 0.9 g protein, 19.7 g carbohydrate, 2.1 g fat.

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Khua Kling, Thai food

       Khua Kling is a pillar of southern Thai cuisine, a dish that can be found throughout Thailand’s south, as well as in any restaurant serving southern Thai cuisine. It’s simply a dry meat curry, and while Thais usually make it with pork, you may use whatever type of meat you like, including fish, beef, chicken, and hog.

Khua Kling, Thai food, Thailand

Khua Kling's History

       Khua Kling refers to a dish made of shallots, garlic, galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, and turmeric, all of which are fried with shrimp paste until fragrant. Then add the meat, such as pig, beef, pork ribs, or fish, and toss everything together before seasoning with your favorite condiment. Turmeric is an essential element in the Khua Kling cuisine. Turmeric is a common spice in Thai cuisine, particularly in the south. Turmeric is also a common component in the cuisines of many countries, including India and Southeast Asia. Khua Kling is a dish that has long been associated with the people of the south. It was not born at any point in time, according to the evidence. There is just one thing we know about it: it was created by Thai ancestors for food wisdom, and it used herbs as the major ingredient in folk cookery.

Khua Kling, Thai food, Thailand

Khua Kling's Advantages

       Khua Kling is another southern dish that is becoming increasingly popular among Thais. In the past, Thai people in other parts of the country might have only known Kaeng Tai Pla, or yellow curry. The main ingredient in Khua Kling is meat, which can be chicken, beef, or pork, but the majority of people choose pork. It’s either minced pork or ground pork that’s used. You can buy ground pork instead of chopping it yourself if you don’t want to do it yourself. Red curry paste is often used in the South for the curry paste used in Khua Kling. The southern section, on the other hand, may add anything to increase the spiciness, such as pepper. As a result, Khua Kling’s major ingredients are curry paste and pork, which are then fried and roasted till dry. When you consume the pork, it crumbles and is really easy to eat. But, above all, it must be served with vegetables. Because there are no vegetables on this food menu. Spices, herbs, or kaffir lime leaves will be added to the curry to enhance the aroma. When it comes to Thai curry paste, the possibilities are endless. In fact, Thai curry pastes come in a wide range of flavors.

Khua Kling, Thai food, Thailand

       Red curry paste, green curry, red curry, and other types of curry are all available. The main curry will contain galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, garlic, and shallots in some recipes. Despite the fact that these are spices, they have numerous health benefits. The Institute of Nutrition is conducting research into curry paste. Curry paste was studied by the Institute of Nutrition, which discovered that it is high in antioxidants. Because curry paste is a great blend of different herbs and spices. It was discovered to lessen inflammation in the body’s cells when it was studied in the lab. Even when the curry paste is blended with meat, which is a source of protein, this spice is still incredibly nutritious. If you want to make it even better, serve it with veggies or other side dishes. Vegetables help boost dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals, in addition to lowering spiciness.

Khua Kling, Thai food, Thailand

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Turmeric's health benefits in Khua Kling

       When you ingest Khua Kling, you will receive the following benefits: It aids in the healing of stomach ulcers. By introducing fresh turmeric to pound completely, you can assist clean the intestines, drive bile, minimize intestinal peristalsis, and relieve hemorrhage. Then squeeze the juice and combine it with lime water before eating it to help heal stomach disorders, alleviate gallstones, cure intestinal inflammation, nourish the liver, and avoid hepatitis. pancreatitis, as well as protecting the liver from paracetamol damage, strengthening the bladder sphincter, treating colitis, and preventing hemorrhoids.

Khua Kling, Thai food, Thailand

Khua Kling ingredients

       Half a teaspoon of sugar, 250 grams of pork or chicken 1 tablespoon fish sauce, 2 tablespoons chopped kaffir lime leaves, 1 part curry paste 1 tbsp. fresh pepper

Khua Kling, Thai food, Thailand

How to cook Khua Kling

1. Preheat the pan on the stove.

2. Add the roughly chopped pork and stir slowly until the pork is cooked, then add the curry paste that has been prepared. Then continue to roast until the curry paste is well distributed throughout the pork.

3. Add sugar and fish sauce to taste. Taste the fish sauce to see if it is salty before adding it. If it’s not salty enough, season with fish sauce. If it’s salty, you don’t need to add it because the curry paste already contains shrimp paste.

4. Add fresh pepper to the roast if the flavor is ready. So add shredded kaffir lime leaves and sprinkle to roast until thoroughly blended, until the pepper is tender. Place on a serving plate and get ready to serve.

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Por Pier Tod, Thai food

       “Por Pier Tod” has been influenced by China. It was made by wrapping wheat flour in various fillings and rolling it, which Thais have adapted to their culture. The dish is divided into two parts: fresh spring rolls and fried spring rolls (Por Pier Tod), each with its own distinct flavor. The frying methods are the key to the deliciousness of the fried spring rolls. Where the oil must be hot in order to absorb oil Furthermore, the sauce enhances the flavor of the more delectable spring rolls.

Por Pier Tod, Thai food, Thailand

Por Pier Tod story

       Fresh Por Pier is cooked wheat flour that is thin and circular in shape. Then it’s wrapped in blanched bean sprouts, a variety of vegetables, pork, Chinese sausage, and salted tofu, then finished with a sweet and salty sauce. Pork piers are delicious and nutritious to consume. Por Pier Tod is a dough sheet containing veggies, vermicelli, and other elements that each chopped will add. Then fry until golden and crispy, then serve with a dipping sauce that has a sour-sweet flavor and is a bit spicy.

Por Pier Tod, Thai food, Thailand

       Por Pier, also known as spring rolls, was once considered a Chinese snack or daytime snack. Por Pier or spring rolls have also been developed into a range of menus, including a dessert recipe that is ideal for many people who enjoy a sweet taste. As a result, the Por Pier is divided into entire Roti, Crepes, and even Chinese-style pizzas that appear and taste like the Chinese people enjoy. When the recipe was published in Thailand, it was changed to better suit the tastes of Thai people.

Por Pier Tod, Thai food, Thailand

       Por Pier can be made in a variety of ways. For example, the first is “Jeng Bia,” or “Jian Ping,” which is made by mixing wheat flour and water until almost liquid, then pouring into the bottom of a pan to spread the flour until cooked, along with adding ingredients like eggs, vegetables, and meat. This type of snack is known as Chinese crepe or Chinese Waffle. Another recipe called “Luo Pia” involves mixing wheat flour with water and kneading it until it makes a soft dough, which is then kneaded with a stick to form a thin round sheet, which is then fried or grilled until crispy. It’s as wonderful whether eaten raw or cooked with other foods. The last recipe is “Bao Pin,” which is also known as Por Pier among Thais.

Por Pier Tod, Thai food, Thailand

Por Pier Tod nutrition

       Nutritional information: “Por Pier Tod” is a low-calorie food. It’s typically made with vermicelli noodles and stuffed with sliced cabbage, minced pork, and mushrooms. If the oil is not sufficiently heated while cooking, it will absorb so much of the oil that it becomes unhealthy. We always eat together, though, with fresh holy basil leaves and vitamin-rich cabbage. However, we always eat with a side dish that is high in vitamins and minerals, such as fresh holy basil leaves or fresh cabbage. Por Pier Tod or fried spring rolls contain 196 calories, 10 grams of protein, 29 grams of carbohydrates, 4.5 grams of fat, sugar, and fibers per 100 grams.

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Por Pier Tod, Thai food, Thailand

Ingredients of Por Pier Tod

       Ingredients of Por Pier Tod: 150 g vermicelli, 80 g minced pork, 50 g chopped Jew’s ear mushroom, 80 g thinly sliced cabbage 30-gram shredded carrot Seasonings include soy sauce and fish sauce. Oil for stir-frying and deep-frying vegetables Wrapping spring rolls, Holy basil leaves, and cabbage, both fresh.

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Khao Mok Gai, Thai food

      Khao Mok Gai is a Thai cuisine that first gained popularity in the southern part of the country. It’s a favorite dish among Thai Muslims, which explains the Malay flavor, as a big percentage of Southern Thais have Malay ancestors. Khao mok Gai is the name of the dish. “Khao” means rice, “Mok” means “bury” or “place beneath,” and “Gai” means “chicken.” Although the dish originates in Thailand’s southern region, it is readily available throughout the country at a cheap price as a popular street food. It is a popular dish among Thais and tourists alike.

Thai Chicken Biryani or Khao Mok Gai, Thai food, Thailand

Khao Mok Gai story

       Thai Chicken Biryani or Khao Mok Gai, Chicken Biryani is one of the most distinctive foods in the Middle East, attracting Muslims from all over the region. Biryani originated in India, where it was influenced by Persia. The dish became famous When Indians and Persians came to Thailand to trade goods. Biryani was mentioned in King Rama II’s poem “Verse of Food and Dessert” as “rice cooked in a spice, delightful flavor with Cardamom”. Persian-Arabic Biryani style, it cooked with spices and topped with fried shallots, raisins, and almonds.

Thai Chicken Biryani or Khao Mok Gai, Thai food, Thailand

       Thai Chicken Biryani or Khao Mok Gai, is also cooked with turmeric powder and has a yellow color, it is served with chicken meat. Thais refer to it as “cigarette rice”.  Khao Mok Gai is a one-of-a-kind meal made up of various spices that give the menu a rich aroma. Although Khao Mok Kai is not the only authentic Thai dish, it has become a popular Thai dish. The recipe is available in general stores, flat markets, department stores, and upscale restaurants throughout Thailand, particularly in the south.

Thai Chicken Biryani or Khao Mok Gai, Thai food, Thailand

Nutrition of Khao Mok Gai

       Nutrition of Khao Mok Gai: Many herbs, such as cinnamon, cardamom, clove, and saffron or turmeric, are used in the dish to produce aromatic yellow rice. Aromatic herbs have a variety of health benefits. Cinnamon, for example, is carminative, cloves improve digestion, cardamom aids in the removal of phlegm, saffron improves eyesight and helps you relax, and turmeric relieves flatulence.

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Thai Chicken Biryani or Khao Mok Gai, Thai food, Thailand

Ingredients of Khao Mok Gai

       Ingredients: for rice, 300 g rice, 3 tbsp oil or Ghee, 3 12 cup water, 5 g cardamom seeds, 2 cinnamon sticks, 3 clove flowers, 1 tbsp saffron, 2 tbsp turmeric power a grain of salt, Served with fried shallots as a garnish. For chicken, 1 pound chicken, 2 teaspoons turmeric powder, 2 teaspoons coriander seed powder, 1 teaspoon cumin powder, 1 teaspoon black pepper, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 cup yogurt.

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Kaeng Panang, Thai food

       The Thai red curry’s milder, sweeter, and creamier brother is kaeng panang. Coconut cream, spices, and ground peanuts are used to wrap succulent chunks of beef, chicken, or duck, which are then topped with lime leaves and Thai basil. Finally, lime leaves and, in certain cases, Thai basil leaves are added to the meal. It’s a simple recipe that doesn’t include any vegetables.

Kaeng Panang, Thai food, Thailand

Kaeng Panang story

       Panang curry or Kaeng Panang, “Panang” is a recipe that has been influenced by Indian cuisine, but there is no evidence that it has been mixed with Khmer cuisine. However, the Khmer language was used to name the dish, with the word “Panang” originally used to describe cross-legged action in Khmer. Thai borrowed the word and used it to explain the same meaning before the Ayutthaya era. The name of a well-known Buddha statue from the Ayutthaya period is “Phra Panang Choeng,” which translates as “the Buddha Sitting Cross-Legged.”

Kaeng Panang, Thai food, Thailand

       It was derived from the Khmer language, and later, “Phra Panang Choeng” changed its spelling to “Phanan Choeng” in the present. All of this suggests that the Khmer had an impact on Thai tradition, particularly in Panang curry. Some Thais believe the dish was influenced by Indonesia because it is similar to an Indonesian dish called “Rendang,” which is made from beef.  Panang refers to a Thai curry dish. Chili, galangal, lemongrass, coriander root, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, garlic, and salt are the main ingredients in the curry. Meat, whether beef, pork, or chicken, can be used in a variety of ways, depending on personal preference.

Kaeng Panang, Thai food, Thailand

Nutrition of Kaeng Panang

       Nutrition of Panang curry: It contains a lot of protein. Coconut milk contains a moderate amount of fat. Which is high-quality fat that gives the body energy. Furthermore, red meat is a good source of iron, and spices like galangal, lemongrass, and shallots have properties that help expel wind, relieve colic, flatulence, and reduce phlegm

Kaeng Panang, Thai food, Thailand

Kaeng Panang Ingredients

       Ingredients: 2 cups coconut cream, 300 grams meat, thinly sliced, ½ cup red curry paste, 2 tbsp. peanut, roasted, 2-3 fish sauces, 1 palm sugar, 2 grams kaffir lime leaves, 2 grams kaffir lime leaves.

Kaeng Panang, Thai food, Thailand

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kaeng panang preparation

       To begin, a special panang curry paste is made with peanuts, red peppers, galangal, and lemongrass. The thick top layer of cream from a can of coconut milk is heated until it swells and releases the coconut oil. The curry paste is baked until it emits strong aromas, and the chosen meat is stewed in it. Finally, palm sugar, salt, and fish sauce are added to the dish. The curry is finished with a few strips of lime leaves and rings of chilli pepper sprinkled on top.

Kaeng Panang, Thai food, Thailand

How to eat Kaeng Panang

       This dry curry is always served on a plate rather than in a bowl. Bowls are typically used for soup-like curries. Rice is typically served with panang, but noodles and roti are also popular accompaniments. Thais prefer to eat their curries with a spoon and a fork.

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