Tag Archives: Thai Desserts

Thong Yod, Thai dessert

       Eggs are a versatile ingredient that can be used to make a variety of foods and desserts such as fried rice, omelettes, cake, and so on. It is also an important component of Thai desserts, particularly Thong Yod. Thong Yod (golden egg-yolk drops) is an ancient Thai dessert that resembles a water drop. “Maria Guyomar de Pina” published the dessert during the Ayutthaya period. She adapted a Portuguese dessert recipe to create a new dessert recipe. Thong Yod is a type of auspicious dessert that is used in many blessed ceremonies or given as a gift to respected adults, relatives, and friends on important occasions. Thais believed that the dessert would be blessed with wealth and the ability to spend money indefinitely.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

Thong Yod's History

       One of the traces left by the Portuguese is the sweetness of Thong Yod, which is still popular today. Thao Thong Kip Ma, also known as Maria Guyomar de Pina, was the wife of Chao Phraya Wichayen (foreigner nobles) who played an important role during King Narai the Great’s reign. Thao Thong Kip Ma invented many ancient desserts and taught Thai people how to make them. There is no clear evidence that “Thao Thong Kip Ma” or “Maria Guyomar de Pina” was born between B.E.2201 and 2209. There was a calculation based on the year of her marriage with Chao Phraya Wichayen in B.E. 2225, when Marie was only 16 years old.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

       According to the ancient document, her father’s name was “Fanik.” He was half Japanese and half Bengali, and her mother’s name was “Ursula Ya Mada.” She was of Japanese and Portuguese descent, and they immigrated to the Ayutthaya kingdom. Tao Thong Kip Ma had served in the Bureau of the Royal Household as “royal property sentinel head” for one lifetime, with the main duty of looking after the royal silver ware, royal gold ware, royal clothes, and preparing fruits. There were all female employees under her command. She spent all of her time working at the royal palace, where she spent her honesty and swore to her duty. During her service, she taught Thai people how to make sweets such as Thong Yod, Thong Yib, Thong Plu, Thong Prong, Khanom Ping, and others. Those dessert recipes were passed down through each family and are still popular among Thai people today.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Although Marie was of foreign origin, she was born and raised in Thailand until the end of her life, when she left her last legacy, a hybrid Thai cookbook, as a memorial to the two nations’ relationship. The Thai-Portuguese relationship celebrated its 500th anniversary in 2011, with Portugal being the first European nation to trade with Thailand during the reign of King Ramathibodi II. At the time, the king gave the land along the Chao Phraya River, Samphao Lom Subdistrict, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Province to establish a “Portuguese Village” to reward the passion for fighting in Chiang Kran until victory.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Many nationalities coexisted peacefully in Portuguese villages. When Ayutthaya was defeated, residents of the Portuguese village joined Taksin the Great in establishing a new village on the Chao Phraya River. It is known as the “Kuti Chin Community” and is located next to the Chinese community to the south. Currently, some of them have established a new community near the Portuguese embassy. Khanom Thong Yod is a one-of-a-kind Thai national culture. It’s a dish that’s been served with Thai rice since the beginning of time. It is a demonstration of the delicacy in making Thai desserts from raw materials to methods of making, meticulousness in taste, color, beauty, aroma, external appearance, and decoration, all of which reflect Thai culture from the past to the present.

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Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

Ingredients for Thong Yod

– 12 duck eggs

– 1 bowl rice flour

– 8 cups granulated sugar (1 kg, 8 sticks)

4 to 8 cups of water

– 4 cups of granulated sugar

4 cups of jasmine water

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Thong Yod

1. Separate the eggs, reserving only the yolk. Then, using a wooden beater, beat the eggs until foamy, about 8 minutes. Sift the rice flour 1-2 times and mix with the beaten eggs, adding the flour in small amounts. Gently stir in the red color, which should be the color of a chicken egg.

2. Combine 8 cups granulated sugar and 4 cups water in a saucepan, bring to a boil, and stir until the sugar dissolves. Strain through a thin white cloth. Divide the syrup into three equal parts, two for dripping and one for soaking the drops.

3. Place the mixed eggs in tablets, smear with the middle finger, and shake off the juice with the thumb, or use a salad with a spoon. Allow it to cook until all of the prepared flour has been dropped.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

Thong Yod Dropping Techniques

       Tilt the cup with your index and middle fingers, then sweep the egg up with your thumb. Push down by flicking the wrist slightly backwards, causing the egg to flick backwards. Thong Yod will have a stub of a tail. Add about a third of the syrup and a little water. The sugar bubbles will burst, revealing the golden granules. Allow them to boil for about 2 minutes before adding a little more water. Then, return it to a boil. Repeat 3 times more until the Thong yod is cooked and clear. Scoop up and pour in the prepared syrup.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

Thong Yod Preparation Tips:

1. Examine the syrup before dropping. It will be a fine bubble, indicating that the syrup is ready to use; when the eggs are dropped into the syrup, they will be flat. The bubbles must have been bubbling while dropping the syrup.

2. Depending on the beaten eggs, more or less flour will be added to the flour mixture; less flour must be added. If you put too much, it will result in The flour is so thick that it can not be dropped. If the eggs are very fluffy, add a little more flour. Take note of how much flour is added, as well as the appearance of the eggs, and stir. The dough is slightly thick and does not flow quickly, but it can be used. Pour in the thickened flour for this step. It is appropriate for those who do not have It will be simpler to begin learning to drop. When you’re more experienced, you can reduce the flour to speed up the cooking process.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

3. It must be cooked a little longer by soaking it in syrup. If it rises too quickly, Thong Yod will become less soft.

4. Those who have never done anything, Before adding it to the syrup, try putting it in a cup. It is necessary to scrape the powder from the cup and place it in the original cup. Check to see if it’s in good condition. Drop it into the syrup if it’s in good shape.

5. If using rice flour, bake the dough with a fragrant candle to make it smell good, or use Thong Yod Flour. Thong Yod flour is made from baked rice flour.

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

Thong Yod's Positive Qualities

1. It has a smooth and shiny texture.

2. Thong Yod meat is soft on the inside and outside.

3. No fishy odor

Thong Yod, Thai desserts, Thailand

Thong Yod provides energy and nutrients.

Energy and nutrientsThong Yod contains 302 kcal of total energy, 4 g protein, 58 g carbohydrate, and 6 g fat per 100 g.

       Khanom Thong Yod, made from eggs, sugar, and Thong Yod flour. There are also nutrients that give the body energy. Furthermore, the protein in eggs aids in the repair of worn-out body parts and contains fat nutrients that keep the body warm. There is enough energy to carry on as usual.

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Khao Tom Mud, Thai dessert

       Khao Tom Mud (Coconut Sticky Rice with Banana Filling) is a popular Thai dessert that few people are unfamiliar with. The dessert is both useful and nutritious, and the ingredients are easily available locally. It is also a dessert that uses flavored rice, which is the staple food of Thai people. It is possible to consider “Khao Tom Mud” to be one of Thai ancestors’ local wisdom. Khao Tom Mud is also one of the desserts that Thais enjoy offering to monks and using in merit events on a regular basis. It’s inexpensive, simple to obtain, and aids in stomach filling. If you visit Thailand, don’t miss out on tasting this sweet and delicious Thai dessert.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud's Story

       “Khao Tom Mud” or “Khao Tom Phad” is a sticky rice and coconut milk dessert. The banana filling is then wrapped in banana leaves or young coconut leaves and steamed until cooked. In the south, sticky rice with coconut milk wrapped in banana leaves is known as “Hor Tom,” and if wrapped in coconut leaves and tied with a rope, it is known as “Hor Mud.” The dessert is similar to Khao Tom Mud, which is also found in other countries. In the Philippines, for example, it is known as “Ibos or Suman” and it, like Khao Tom Mud, is classified into several varieties. Another type of Khao Tom Mud is “Khao Tom Luk Yod,” which is a dessert served at the end of Buddhist Lent. It is wrapped in an oval shape from coconut or bay leaf, covering glutinous rice mixed with black beans without filling, tied together in a bunch, and cooked. Another dish from the south is “Khao Tom Mud Tai,” which is boiled rice wrapped and tied with golden beans pounded with coriander root, garlic, pepper, pork, lard, seasoned with salt, water, and sugar, wrapped in banana leaves into sticks, tied into 4-5 pieces, and boiled. The northeastern region refers to Khao Tom Mud as Khao Tom Kluay, which is wrapped in raw sticky rice and seasoned with a pinch of salt. Add the boiled peanuts, mix them together, then wrap them in bundles, then add the banana fillings and bring to a boil until they are cooked. If it’s a fried recipe, it will first stir-fry sticky rice with coconut milk before wrapping it in banana filling and boiling it. If you want a sweet taste, dip it in sugar before eating.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

       In Laos, there is also Khao Tom Mud, which is called “Khao Tom” if the salty filling is made with lard and mung bean paste and “Khao Tom” if the sweet filling is made with bananas. There is also a similar dessert called “Khao Tom Yuan,” which is similar to Khao Tom Mud but is wrapped larger and cooked by boiling before being eaten. It is cut into small pieces and tossed with grated coconut, salt, and sugar before being eaten. The last one is Khao Tom Mud, which is cooked in the Bok sub-district of Srisaket province. The dessert is twice as long as normal Khao Tom Mud, but it is still wrapped in banana leaves and made with glutinous rice in three colors: black glutinous rice, red glutinous rice, and normal glutinous rice, as well as bananas and black beans, and it can also be filled with corn. In 2014, the Ministry of Culture’s Department of Cultural Promotion designated Khao Tom Mud as an intangible cultural heritage in the field of knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe in order to prevent its extinction.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud's religious beliefs

       According to Buddhist legend, the Lord Buddha wishes to appease his mother because he died 7 days after his birth and was reborn as a god in the Dusit heaven. As a result, in the seventh year following his enlightenment, the Buddha ascended to live in the Daowadung heaven. Preach the Abhidhamma Pitaka and please the Buddha’s mother for one year, until he descended from the Daowadung heaven and settled in Sangkassa. Many people flocked to see Lord Buddha in order to offer food and other items to him, causing some people to be unable to enter the alms bowl. As a result, they created Khao Tom and threw them into the Buddha’s alms bowl. And it was said that before throwing, the townspeople prayed that their Khao Tom would fall into the bowl rather than hitting the Buddha, which was the origin of the phrase “Khao Tom Luk Yod.”

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

       Thais typically bring Khao Tom Mud to offer to monks during the merit events ceremony on the last day of Buddhist Lent, also known as the Tak Bat Devo ceremony. The reason Thais liked to bring Khao Tom Mud to offer to the monks was because they believed, according to legend in the Buddha’s time, that the city people who came to wait for the Lord Buddha in the Buddha’s time to make merit and offer food to monks because it was convenient and easy to eat. Some people claimed that it was customary to bring khao Tom Mud to make offerings to monks because it was used as supplies for traveling to spread Buddhism in distant places. Khao Tom Mud is more than just a snack; it also has cultural values, which are the cultural roots of Thai people.

       Furthermore, in the past, rice porridge was given as a symbol of a couple. Because Khao Tom Mud will appear to be bringing two desserts to tie together. They believe that if young people make merit with Khao Tom Mud on the Buddhist Lent day, their love will be good and their married life will last forever, just like Khao Tom Mud. People used to make Khao Tom Mud to give to monks on the last day of Buddhist Lent.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud Ingredients

1 kg glutinous rice

-1/2 cup black beans, cooked

-3 quarts coconut milk

–2 teaspoons salt

-A leaf of pandanus

1 cup sugar plus 1/2 cup

-10-15 bananas that are ripe (or other fillings of your choice)

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Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud wrapping equipment

-banana leaves

-Hammered and soaked in water for 2-3 hours to soften (or rope)

-steamer

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Khao Tom Mud

1. Soak the black beans overnight, then steam until tender.

2. Thoroughly wash the glutinous rice (about twice) and soak it in water for 4 hours before scooping it up and draining it.

3. In a medium-high heat pan, combine the coconut milk and pandan leaves. When the coconut milk begins to boil, remove the pandan leaves and season with salt and sugar.

4. Remove from the heat and stir in the sticky rice and coconut milk. Stir-fry for about 15 minutes, or until the glutinous rice begins to dry, then set aside to cool.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

5. Peel and cut the bananas in half before preparing them. Tear the banana leaves into two pieces. Place the banana leaves with the light colored side facing each other, large leaves on the outside and small leaves on the inside.

6. Scoop about 1 tablespoon glutinous rice onto a banana leaf with a spoon and flatten the glutinous rice. Place the banana in the center and cover it once more with sticky rice. Then top it with black beans.

7. Then tightly wrap and fold the banana leaf and tie it with a peg or rope. Do everything.

8. Place the steamed rice in a crate. Steam for 20 minutes on high heat, then remove it from the steamer and place it on a serving plate.

Khao Tom Mud , Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Tom Mud Nutrition

Khao Tom Mud provides energy and nutrients.

Whole grain porridge contains 183 calories, 2.5g protein, 38g carbohydrates, and 2.3g fat per 100g.

Khao Tom Mud’s Nutritional Advantages

– Glutinous rice is a type of carbohydrate. Give the body energy, give the body warmth.

– Bananas are carbohydrates that provide energy to the body. They also provide warmth, allowing the body to perform various activities effectively.

– Salt is a carbohydrate that gives the body energy. It provides warmth, allowing the body to perform a variety of tasks effectively. The solubility of the substance affects digestion, absorption, and how much it can be used.

-Proteins are found in black beans or peanuts, followed by fats, minerals, and vitamins. Assist the body in growing by, for example, assisting in the formation of cells and tissues. including the replacement of worn organ parts. It is the chemical component that gives it the ability to resist disease and provide energy when carbohydrate intake is insufficient. A gram of protein contains 4 calories.

– Sugar is a carbohydrate that provides energy to the body. It also provides warmth, which allows the body to perform various activities well.

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Kanom Sai Sai, Thai dessert

        Khanom Sai Sai, also known as Kanom Sot Sai, is a traditional Thai dessert. It has a sweet, delicious taste and a soft, chewy texture. It is stuffed with sweet coconut filling and wrapped in banana leaves, which gives it a natural aroma. Anyone who gets a taste will be hooked. People used to eat some because there were hawker stalls selling it, but it was a difficult cooking process, and the new generation does not like eating Thai desserts. As a result, few people are familiar with the dessert’s appearance and flavor. Khanom Sai Sai is a Thai dessert that is served at auspicious events, most notably the engagement ceremony, which includes a parade of Khan Mak on their way to pick up the bride. A Khanom Sai Sai is one of nine Thai desserts that are served during an engagement ceremony.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

The story of Khanom Sai Sai

       Khanom Sai Sai is a Thai dessert that was once used in Khan Mak ceremonies. It is commonly served as a dessert at weddings. Khanom Sai Sai must stuff with two fillings and produce with an even number because the ancient era believed that if there is only one filling and a single number, newlyweds will be separated from each other for a long time. As a result, if the dessert is used in a wedding ceremony, two fillings must be combined, implying that the couple is in love, harmonious, and will be together for a long time. Nowadays, the dessert is rarely seen in a wedding ceremony because the new generation does not believe in old traditions like the ancients. As a result, it is not commonly used in auspicious events, as it was by the ancient people in the past.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Khanom Sai Sai is wrapped in banana leaves and tied in a tall shape with Tiao (Tiao is coconut-palm leaf stalk). The recipe has several important components: first, the filling is fragrant and sweet, second, there is a salty taste with a fresh coconut milk topping, and the top layer is thick enough but not messy. Nowadays, it is difficult to find delicious Khanom Sai Sai that are both fragrant and sweet because the recipe calls for fresh and thickened coconut milk, which is now quite expensive and a good quality ingredient that is difficult to find.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

Ingredients for Khanom Sai Sai

• 2+1/2 cup shredded coconut

•1+1/2 cup coconut palm sugar

• Warm water

• a scented candle used to smoke sweetmeats

• 2 tbsp glutinous rice flour

• one-third cup cold water (or pandan juice, chilled butterfly pea juice to add color)

• one-third cup rice flour

• 2 tsp kosher salt

• 3+1/3 cup coconut milk

 

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

Khanom Sai Sai wrapping supplies

Khanom Sai Sai wrapping supplies

• Banana peels

• Leaves of coconut

• skewers made of wood

Make the banana leaves.

1. Cut the banana leaves into two pieces, one large sheet about 5X9 centimeters in size and one small sheet about 4X6 centimeters in size.

2. Make a triangle out of the head end. Wipe both sides clean and set them aside to dry in the sun for a few moments. (to prevent the banana leaf from breaking while wrapping the dessert)

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Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

Prepare Khanom Sai Sai filling ingredients.

1. Combine grated coconut and coconut sugar in a mixing bowl. In a pan over low heat, the water is boiled until the mixture becomes sticky and dry. Take it off the heat and set it aside to cool completely.

2. When the mixture has completely cooled, shape it into a ball about 1 inch in diameter and place it in a covered container.

3. Prepare the filling mixture for baking with candle smoke.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

making Khanom Sai Sai dough.

making Khanom Sai Sai dough.

Knead the glutinous rice flour in cold water until it forms a ball. Then shape it into a round ball the size of the coconut’s face. Make the necessary preparations.

Ingredients for Khanom Sai Sai topping

In a mixing bowl, combine rice flour, salt, and coconut milk until combined. Pour into a brass (or Teflon) pan and stir over medium heat until thick and boiling all over. Remove it from the heat and set it aside to cool.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to Prepare Khanom Sai Sai Wrapped in Banana Leaves

1. Spread the molded glutinous rice flour into thin sheets (enough to completely cover the filling), then pick up the filling in the center and completely cover the dough. Place the dessert on top of the banana leaves that have been stacked.

2. Place a large banana leaf (soft side up) on top of a small banana leaf. Put the filling in place. Then, on top of the filling, spoon about 1/2 teaspoon of the topping.

3. Form a tall shape out of a banana leaf. Tie and fasten the prepared coconut leaves with a wooden skewer. Make the loins long enough by cutting the ends diagonally. In the steamer, place the dessert wrappers.

4. Steam the snacks for about 10 minutes in a steaming set over simmering water. Remove it from the heat.

Kanom Sai Sai, Thai desserts, Thailand

The advantages of Khanom Sai Sai

Khanom Sai Sai provides energy and nutrients.

136 kcal/piece of energy content

Carbohydrate-rich recipes help to nourish the blood and make the body work more efficiently. aids in the prevention of degenerative diseases, cancer, paralysis, heart disease, and high blood pressure. Furthermore, it can lower cholesterol, narrow blood vessels, alleviate gout and migraine symptoms, relieve stress, and aid in sleep. Menstrual pain is a golden age problem that must be solved.

Precautions to Take When Consuming Khanom Sai Sai

This menu is not suitable for diabetics due to its high sugar content. should be consumed in an appropriate quantity.

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Khao Yacoo, Thai dessert

          Khao Yacoo, also known as Khao Kra Yacoo (rice milk), is a nutritious cereal drink that many people have never tried or even heard of. Khao Yacoo is a traditional Thai dessert that is now highly sought after and extremely difficult to obtain because it is a snack available only during the rice harvest season. The method of cooking the ingredients is linked to Thai people’s traditional way of life regarding “Mae Phosop,” which distinguishes this dish. And it isn’t well-known. Khao Yacoo is a type of rice that is cooked with additional ingredients like it was during the Buddha’s time. There is a story about a monk named “Anon” who used to cook brown rice, green beans, and sesame to make a liquid rice offering to the Lord Buddha when he was sick with a stomach ailment. He felt better because Khao Yacoo was good for stomach disease, hunger, and thirst, and it could give stamina and relieve exhaustion. Rice, according to some, has elixir characteristics as well.

Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

The history of Khao Yacoo

       Khao Yacoo is soft rice that takes two to two and a half months to prepare. During this time, young rice will still contain milk inside. The outer shell is likewise green, which is rich in nutrients, and it must be squeezed fresh while cutting new rice to obtain complete Yacoo rice milk. Yacoo can also be consumed as rice milk. As a dessert, it has also been swirled with sugar. The natural hue of rice milk is green, therefore Khao Ya coo is green. As a dessert, some people added oats and covered them with coconut milk. The tradition of creating Yacoo rice milk, which dates back to the Sukhothai period, is thought to have started with the Brahmins of India. It is a merit to be made at the period when the rice plants are growing milk for the rice fields’ prosperity. We have the Thai practice of merit-making at the end of the 10th month, which is when the rice is ripe, just like the Thai people. As a result, young rice that had just emerged from the milk was taken to be cooked as holy rice, Payas rice, Yacoo rice, and Khanom Krayasart, and offered to monks for rice field prosperity.

Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

       In addition, stirring Yacoo rice is a long-standing ritual. It is traditionally performed on Makha Bucha Day in the third month. Once the stirring is completed, a portion of the mixture will be taken to offer to the monks. The remainder is distributed to relatives and friends in the notion that Yacoo rice milk is a nectar food that aids customers’ mental wisdom. Mrs. Suchada baked soft rice called “Madupayasayakhu Rice” and offered it to the Lord Buddha, who obtained enlightenment after eating it, according to the Buddha’s narrative. As a result, Madupayasayakhu or Yacoo rice is thought to be a magnificent dish. Belief in Yakhu rice milk as a nectar food also grants you total health, long life, and glowing skin. It can cure many kinds of diseases, as well as inspire people to achieve their goals.

Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

Yacoo rice during the Buddha's time

       In the Buddhist era, Yacoo rice was a common dish. According to mythology, two brothers were farmers, the elder being Mahakarn and the younger being Chulkan. They had a lot of lands. During the rice pregnancy season, The elder brothers disagreed with Chulkan’s idea of bringing the rice to cook and gift to the Lord Buddha. They’d have to throw away a modest bit of rice in the field. The younger decided to divide the fields and bring the rice to his farm to cook what is known as Yacoo rice, which he then dedicated to Lord Buddha for praying for rebirth in Buddhism, giving birth to “Phra Anya Kondanya.” Yacoo comes from the Pali word “Yacoo,” which means “porridge.” Yacoo rice and grains were steeped in water until the husks relaxed, then boiled until half-cooked during the Buddha’s time. It’s food for ill and hungry people. aids digestion and helps cleanse the intestines. According to legend, the Buddha and his disciples were served Yacoo rice and dessert by a brahmin. Yacoo rice did not have a sweet flavor at the time. 

Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

       When the Lord Buddha became ill with the wind in the Nabhi, he summoned Ananda and told him to go get alms and bring rice water to make medicine. Ananda took the Lord Buddha’s alms bowl and headed to the doctor’s front door, but all he found was the doctor’s wife. The doctor’s wife, on the other hand, was clever and cooked Yacoo rice with rice water, jujube, and masang, using four parts water. When the Buddha ate the Yacoo, the sickness vanished. It was made with three hot spices: coriander, Mahahingu, and garlic, then baked and spread in the Buddha’s alms bowl.

Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

Yacoo Rice Milk's Advantages

       This Yacoo phrase refers to rice that is rich in nutrients. When used to manufacture Yacoo rice milk, it provides carbs, vitamin B1 to prevent beriberi, vitamin B2, vitamin E to prevent aging, minerals, calcium for strong bones and teeth, and dietary fiber from the crushing of the Yacoo rice husks, which aids in the excretory system. Because the young rice used to manufacture Yacoo rice milk is soft rice in the milky stage, the health benefits of Yacoo rice milk are in the same direction as previous beliefs and proofs of current science. This is the point at which rice has accumulated a significant number of vital nutrients. Aside from the essential elements found in carbs, There are also nutritional supplements among the key vitamins and minerals for the body, such as vitamin B1, which is necessary for nervous system function, growth, and the prevention of beriberi. Vitamin B2 is good for your eyes. As well as preventing canker sores. Vitamin E will aid in the battle against cancer-causing free radicals. Calcium aids in bodily growth and helps to slow down the aging process. It’s a crucial component of the bones and teeth.

Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

Khao Yacoo's main constituent

       6 cups pandan juice, 4 cups undiluted coconut milk, 2 cups granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon coarse salt, 1 cup rice flour, 1 tablespoon wheat flour, the rice ears that are being milked (rice that the pollen has fallen on, the ears of rice will bow), decorated with shredded young coconut. For sprinkling, black sesame seeds have been roasted.

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Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

What is the best way to prepare Khao Yacoo?

1. Separate and carefully wash the rice leaves. Cut off the rice grains with scissors, measure only 1 cup, and pound well.

2. In a mixing bowl, combine pandan juice and pounded rice, whisk well, and strain through a fine white cloth.

3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the salt, sugar, coconut milk, rice flour, and arrowroot flour. Add the second ingredient, stir thoroughly, and strain through a thin white cloth once more.

4. In a gold pan over low heat, whisk the mixture until thick and sticky, then scoop into a container and set aside to cool. Young coconut is garnished, and toasted black sesame seeds are sprinkled on top before serving.

There are two methods for stirring: sweeping in the center and stirring with a spatula. If you’re stirring and slipping, it suggests the flour is sticking to the pan. First and foremost, we must sweep the middle. The correct filling must come into contact with the pestle at the pan’s bottom. It takes 20 minutes to whisk everything together, and then it’s done.

Khao Yacoo, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to eat Khao Yacoo

       Coconut milk is drizzled on top of the dish. Then top with puffed rice and black sesame seeds. However, the proper technique to eat does not require the assistance of others; simply scoop up both sections, the green, and white parts, and place them in your mouth; it will be correct.

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Banana in coconut milk (Kluai Buat Chi)

       Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi), Bananas are a fruit that has long been essential to Thai people. It crosses numerous cultures and encompasses a wide range of meals. Bananas in coconut milk are also one of the most popular Thai meals, which are prepared in every family and given to monks and for other festivals. It’s easy to come by in Thai dessert shops at a reasonable price.

Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi), Thai desserts, Thailand

Banana in coconut milk story

       The Cavendish banana, Lady Finger banana, Musa balbisiana, Kluai Nam Wa, Pisang Awak banana (Kluai Nam Wa), and Lebmuernang banana are the most common banana species in Thailand. Because bananas are easy to come by, have a lot of nutrition, and are delicious, Thai people use them as a raw material for a variety of foods and desserts. Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi) contains a lot of nourishment from bananas, as well as the sweetness of palm sugar and the oiliness of fresh coconut milk, all of which Thais may find in the fields. Furthermore, the scent of pandan leaves was added to the mixture, giving it a pleasant aroma.

Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi), Thai desserts, Thailand

       A Thai dessert is banana in coconut milk. Bananas, coconut milk, and sugar are the major ingredients in this dish. Thai people employed coconut milk as a food ingredient in the past, which led to the creation of this cuisine. Although the recipe calls for Pisang Awak, it can also be made with other types of banana. After laboring in agriculture, northern folks used to make Banana in Coconut Milk for their families. In their own dwellings, they employed banana-derived raw materials. They also bring bananas to the temple to create merit or to welcome visitors to the residence.

Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi), Thai desserts, Thailand

Banana with Coconut Milk: Nutritional Value

       When we need to ingest something that will enter our bodies, we want it to be as beneficial as possible. Banana in coconut milk gives the body just what it needs, namely, nutritious content and other benefits.

First, 1 cup of banana in coconut milk contains 325 calories, 23 grams of protein, 36.4 grams of carbohydrates, and 18.8 grams of fat.

Second, one ripe banana has roughly 6.2 milligrams of vitamin C, or 10% of the daily value, and can be consumed whenever it is used in the dish. Although the amount of vitamin C in the body has decreased, it is still available for usage.

Third, 1 cup of banana in coconut milk provides around 5% of the daily fiber requirement.

Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi), Thai desserts, Thailand

Tip for Banana with Coconut Milk

       First and foremost, we must select bananas that are not overly ripe, and we must sprinkle a little salt in a bowl of water to prevent the bananas from turning dark. Take the bananas in half with the peel on, remembering to cut off the top, and soak for 5-10 minutes in brine, then discard the brine. Boil the banana peels for 10-15 minutes to allow the rubber to float to the surface, preventing the bananas from turning black.

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Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi), Thai desserts, Thailand

Ingredients: banana in coconut milk

12–14 bananas, ripe

2 1/2 cups of coconut milk (fresh)

1/2 cup of sugar.

2 tablespoons of salt, to taste

4 pandan leaves that have seen better days

5 cups of water.

Banana in coconut milk (kluai buat chi), Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Banana in coconut milk

        Fill a brass pot or pan halfway with water. Add about 1/2 cup of jaggery to the sugar mixture. Bring salt and pandan leaves to a crumple, breaking up and tying them together.

       To heat up, use a pot or pan. Stir over high heat until the syrup comes to a boil, then lower the heat slightly. Boil for 8-10 minutes, after adding the bananas.

       It’s a great banana if the skin is ripe and the meat is soft and sensitive. Fill it with coconut milk. You must constantly stir. Don’t let it clump together.

        To add taste, add pandan leaves, then scoop and consume.

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Khanom Tan (Toddy Palm Cake )

       Khanom Tan is a traditional Thai dessert with a dark yellow powdery texture that is also soft and fluffy. It has a sweet taste from the Toddy Palm. It is now difficult to find good taste because the amount of Toddy Palm planting has decreased. As a result, Khanom Tan that are sold in the market that trader often add a little Toddy Palm and add more flour instead, resulting in Khanom Tan having a hard texture and not smelling good, and the process of making it is difficult. Khanom Tan are difficult to find and can be purchased from a variety of markets or even street vendors. Because it is simple to prepare, it is a popular Thai dessert. It’s cheap, and Thais still like to make merit at temples and use it in various ceremonies.

Khanom Tan

Khanom Tan story

       Toddy Palm Cake, also known as Khanom Tan, is a traditional Thai dessert that dates back to the Sukhothai period. The original recipe called for only sugar, rice flour, coconut milk, salt, and shredded coconut as a topping. During the Ayutthaya period, the recipe developed a formular and more methods. Kanom Tan is widely produced throughout Thailand. Toddy Palm is the main ingredient, which is ripe until it is dropped from the sugar palm tree. The first step is to crush the Toddy Palm, which is then combined with rice flour, coconut milk, and sugar. After combining all of the ingredients, place them in banana leaf plates and steam until fluffy, then top with shredded coconut. The recipe can be distinguished by dark-yellow flesh, similar to the original color of Toddy Palm. The texture is soft and fluffy, with a sweet taste and a slight scent of Toddy Palm. Kanom Tan is a popular dessert served at religious ceremonies. For example, it is part of the monks’ offerings in a ceremony, a wedding ceremony, a birthday ceremony, and so on. Khanom Tan has been a part of Thai tradition since ancient times and can be found at all events. It can bestow blessings as cultural beliefs.

Khanom Tan

Nutrition of Khanom Tan

Nutrition of Khanom Tan: There are 49 kcal of total energy, 0.5 g protein, 9.5 g carbohydrate, and 1 g fat in 100g.

Khanom Tan

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Ingredients for Khanom Tan

       Ingredients for Khanom Tan: 200 g ripe Toddy Palm, 250 g rice flour, 320 ml coconut milk, 200 g granulated sugar, 1 tbsp baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 100 g shredded coconut for topping. Khanom Tan is a popular recipe that is easy to find. If you discovered a Thai desserts restaurant, you can also purchase it from a market or a street vendor. The recipe is reasonably priced for one bag, approximately 5-7 pieces, with a price range of 20 – 35 Bath. It’s easy to eat and everyone can get it, so Thai people buy it for monk offerings and ceremonies.

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Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya

       Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya (Sweet Sticky Rice with Thai Custard ) is widely available throughout Thailand, particularly from street vendors. The cost is reasonable depending on the type of recipe. Sweet Sticky Rice with Thai Custard costs around 10 – 30 Bath, while Sangkhaya Fak Thong costs around 40 – 60 Bath for one pumpkin, which can be reduced if purchased in separate pieces. Bread with Sangkhaya, sold in sets for around 40-70 bath.

Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya

Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya story

       Since the Roman Empire, “Sangkhaya” has come from Europe. Prior to entering Southeast Asia, Europe was known as the name “Custard.” Many people believed Sangkhaya gained influence from Portugal when they ruled the port city of Malacca in 1511, allowing them to trade with many kingdoms, including Ayutthaya. During the reign of King Narai the Great, many foreigners, including Chinese, Japanese, and Persians, came to trade in the Ayutthaya Kingdom. Mrs. Maria Guyomar de Pinha, the wife of a nobleman of King Narai named Falcon, was present at the time. She had transformed Portuguese desserts by sourcing the best ingredients in Thailand. Many types of desserts that we are familiar with today, such as Thong Yip, Thong Yot, Foi Thong, Khanom Mo Kaeng, and “Sangkhaya,” arose from her idea. The term “Sangkhaya” is derived from the Malay word Kaya or Seri Kaya, which means “rich.” Sangkhaya’s main ingredients are coconut milk, palm sugar, coconut milk, and eggs, all of which are readily available in Southeast Asia. As a result, Sangkhaya is one of the foods that can be found in many countries, but it has a unique appearance and color.

Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya

Nutrition of Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya

        Nutrition: Sangkhaya is a high-energy recipe that provides a wealth of nutrients. Eggs provide all of the nutrients your body requires. One egg contains vitamin A, folate, vitamin B5, vitamin B12, vitamin B2, phosphorus, selenium, and vitamins D, E, K, B6, calcium, and zinc. Eggs are high in choline, which is a nutrient that the body requires. It helps to build cell membranes and aids in the functioning of neurotransmitters in the brain, and protein improves overall body performance. It has the ability to build and maintain muscles, making them strong, flexible, and long-lasting. Egg whites contain vitamins B2 and B3, whereas egg yolks contain vitamins B5, B6, B12, and folate, making you feel energized all the time. Coconut contains a variety of vitamins and minerals, including multivitamins, iron, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. Sangkhaya ingredient: 2 eggs, 1 cup coconut milk, 2 cups condensed milk, 1/2 cup pandan juice, 1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk, 2 tablespoons granulated sugar or palm sugar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons corn starch.

Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya

Khao Niao Mun Sangkhaya ingredients

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The recipe can be divided into two types based on the ingredients and the method of consumption:

1) Sangkhaya as a dessert, a type of it influenced by Portugal during the Ayutthaya period. It is commonly served with Sweet Sticky Rice or Khao Niew Moon, and another way to prepare it is to mix Sangkhaya flour with pumpkin, taro, or coconut and steam it, which is known as “Sangkhaya Fak Thong” (Stuffed Pumpkin Custard). Eggs, palm sugar, and coconut milk are the main ingredients. This cuisine is also popular in many Southeast Asian countries, including Malaysia, Indonesia, Cambodia, and Singapore.

2) Sangkhaya with bread is made from eggs, palm sugar, coconut milk, and stirred to combine. Finally, add the color and smell with pandan leaves to get a green color, which is known as “Sangkhaya bai toey,” or mixed with tea to get an orange color, which is known as “Sangkhaya cha yen.” This type of Sangkhaya is commonly used for spreading on bread or as a filling. Similar desserts are known as kaya or Srigaya in Malaysia and Indonesia. It is concentrated and can be used as a spread on bread as well as a filling. Eggs, coconut milk, and sugar are among the ingredients. The recipe has been colored and is served with bread, as opposed to the previous formular, which is served with Sweet Sticky Rice or on an individual plate.

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Khanom Thong Yo, Kanchanaburi Food

Kanom Thong Yo

           Khanom Thong Yo (Mee Si) is a traditional Karen dish. It is classified as a sweet or snack food. Mee Si is a Karen word that means mashed rice produced from steamed glutinous rice. Roasted black sesame with salt, mashed together until a homogenous taste, salty and oily, commonly made for making merit and donating generosity to the deceased, considered an offering to Thai Buddhists. Karen folks enjoy making gold yo when travelling long distances. Bring a bamboo canister to eat from along the route because it can be preserved for an extended period of time. Distinct individuality Mee Si is a meal that is peculiar to the Karen people and is used for major rituals. passed on from generation to generation Most Karen people in Thong Pha Phum district used to travel considerable distances along the border. It is critical to be able to preserve food for several days in order to find a quiet home. to locate an appropriate address or destination When the Karen people travel into the jungle to farm for several days, they bring mee as their meal. because sticky rice is used to make Mee si.

           Significance and social and spiritual worth in that community’s way of life Mee Si (or Thong Yo) is a Karen cuisine that can be found in the sub-district where the Karen ethnicity lives. Tha Khanun, Huai Khayeng Subdistrict, Chalae Subdistrict, Hin Dat Subdistrict, Linthin Subdistrict, Pilok Subdistrict, Saphan Nikhom Subdistrict, Somrup Subdistrict Mee Si or Thong Yo is a type of dessert for Thai nationals living in Tha Khanun Sub-district. Thais in Tha Khan sub-district claim that rice was sown in every rai of rice field in ancient times. Glutinous rice must also be cultivated since it is believed that rice is the male and glutinous rice is the female. When harvest season arrives, they would steam the glutinous rice that has been sown in the fields and at the end of the field to make thong yo. Because rice will be more fragrant and taste better than any other season.

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           Significance and social and spiritual worth in that community’s way of life Mee Si (or Thong Yo) is a Karen cuisine that can be found in the sub-district where the Karen ethnicity lives. Tha Khanun, Huai Khayeng Subdistrict, Chalae Subdistrict, Hin Dat Subdistrict, Linthin Subdistrict, Pilok Subdistrict, Saphan Nikhom Subdistrict, Somrup Subdistrict Mee Si or Thong Yo is a type of dessert for Thai nationals living in Tha Khanun Sub-district. Thais in Tha Khan sub-district claim that rice was sown in every rai of rice field in ancient times. Glutinous rice must also be cultivated since it is believed that rice is the male and glutinous rice is the female. When harvest season arrives, they would steam the glutinous rice that has been sown in the fields and at the end of the field to make thong yo. Because rice will be more fragrant and taste better than any other season.

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Khao Lam Nongmon (Sticky rice in bamboo)

khao lam nongmon

          Khao Lam Nongmon It is a well-known delicacy in Chonburi Province with a fascinating history. Nong Mon’s residents used to farm as their primary source of income. and selling Khao Lam Nongmon as a side business at the end of the season. Farmers will go up Khao Bo Yang Hill, which is not far from their village, to cut bamboo. The sticky rice is then exchanged for sugar and coconuts from other houses in order to make khao lam for sale in the hamlet. When the Sukhumvit Road (old line) was cut in 1942, tourists were urged to visit the beach. Bangsaen, a popular tourist attraction at the time. It was more convenient for tourists to stop and buy khao lam as souvenirs to take home, and as a result, Khao Lam Nong Mon became more well-known. Following that, Field Marshal Sarit Thanarat, the Prime Minister at the time, was laid to rest at Bangsaen alongside General Ne Win Burma’s leader. He directed the Khao Lam vendors at Nong Mon Market to demonstrate how to manufacture Khao Lam Nongmon until it was well-known throughout the country.

khao lam nongmon

          The burning of firewood is the secret of the sweetness of Khao Lam Nong Mon that many people have acquired from one another. This gives Khao Lam a pleasant aroma. Nowadays, instead of burning logs, a gas burner is used instead. Simultaneously, the number of persons who burnt Khao Lam for sale has decreased in the past since the production process is complex, and some ingredients, like as bamboo, are uncommon and must be ordered from Cambodia. As a result, many rice vendors in Nong Mon Market buy from the burner and then bring another one for sale rather of making their own untill present.

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