Tag Archives: Thai dessert

Lod Chong, Thai dessert

        Green noodles, sweetened coconut milk, and crushed ice make up Lod Chong, a simple Thai treat. It’s extremely popular because it’s a light and refreshing dessert that goes well with a spicy supper. It is available from a variety of street food sellers at a fair price and is easy to locate. Traditional Lod Chong and Lod Chong Singapore are the two types of dessert, however they are extremely similar. “Cendol,” an iced sweet dish made of green rice flour jelly, coconut milk, and palm sugar syrup, is the dessert’s origin. Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, Singapore, and Myanmar are among the countries where it is popular. Additional toppings, such as diced jackfruit, sweetened red azuki beans, or durian, could be used in addition to the green jelly.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong story

       The origins of “Cendol” are unknown, but it is a popular sweet drink throughout Southeast Asia. Cendol may have begun life as Dawet in Java, Indonesia, according to one theory. The Javanese name “Dawet” was first mentioned in a manuscript written in Surakarta, Central Java, in the early nineteenth century by Serat Centhini between 1814 and 1823. According to an Indonesian academic, a Dawet sweet drink was mentioned in the Kresnayana manuscript, which dates from the Kediri Kingdom in Java around the 12th century. Dawet refers to the entire concoction of Cendol green jellies, which are often produced with weren sagoo or rice flour, coconut milk, and liquid gula jawa in Java (palm sugar syrup). An Indonesian historian claims that in ancient Java’s rice agriculture society, sagoo or rice flour was employed as a sweet beverage ingredient. Cendol jellies and their variants are, in fact, a rural agricultural product that is still made in Javanese communities. Dawet is typically served without ice in Banjarnegara, Central Java. However, today, ice cubes or shaved ice are frequently added to this dessert beverage.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Cendol, on the other hand, has evolved in different ways across the globe. Cendol is a term used in Indonesia to describe “green pandan jelly served in coconut milk,” with pandanus leaves or jackfruit chunks occasionally added. Unlike Cendol in Malaysia and Singapore, where other ingredients like as sweetened red beans and sweet corn are blended in like an es campur, this is not the case. Cendol is frequently served with ice, which may have evolved when ice became more widely available. It’s possible that it started in Malayan port cities like Malacca and Penang, where British refrigerated ships could provide the necessary ice.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Dawet or Cendol is an element of the traditional Javanese wedding ceremony, according to Javanese tradition. A day before the wedding, during the Midodareni ritual, the Dodol Dawet (Javanese meaning “selling Dawet”) is conducted. The parents would sell Dawet to the invited guests and relatives after the siraman bridal shower. The guests paid the Dawet with terracotta coins, which would later be handed to the bride as a symbol of the family’s wealth. The symbolic meaning was the parents’ wish for a large number of guests at the upcoming wedding, “as many as the Cendol jellies being sold.” Dawet street hawkers with pikulan (baskets carried with a balance rod) are widespread in Javanese cities, as seen in this antique shot from around 1935.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       The Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture has designated five Cendol-making traditions as intangible cultural assets in the country. In 2010 and 2018, Yogyakarta province recognized three Dawet (Javanese counterpart of Cendol) customs. Dawet, Dawet Camcau, and Dawet sambel are the names of the three creatures. Cendol was recognized in West Java province in 2016, while Es cendol was approved in Riau Islands province in 2020. The Malaysian Department of National History has designated cindol as a Malaysian heritage cuisine.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong in Thailand

       “Khanom Nok Poloi or Lod Chong Thai” is mentioned in a stone inscription from the Sukhothai period, referring to a ceremony that featured four types of Thai desserts at the time, including frog eggs (basil seeds), Nok Poloi (Lod Chong), Nang Loi (Khao Tok), and Ai Tue (Glutinous Rice) served with coconut milk. Nowadays, Lod Chong is frequently prepared for prestigious events because Thais believe that the name of the dessert, which means “survive,” will protect them from any dangers. Mr. Kitiphum Duangthip, the head pastry chef of Chitralada Palace, explained how to prepare Thai Lod Chong in the ancient times using milled rice. The rice was first soaked in lime water overnight before being milled with pandan leaves. Then combine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl and sprinkle over the dessert.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       A slender head and a big middle are the best features of Lod Chong. This can be accomplished by churning the dough until it gets sticky before scooping it onto the cylinder and sifting it through the slit. Flour through the cavity will remain, some will drip down gradually, not flowing into a stream (Lod Chong flour is excessively fluid), and how to press the Lod Chong flour through the cavity which has to press and loosen do not press all at once because it will cause the flour through the channel to form a long line. The space between the lod chong press mold and the water surface below, on the other hand, must be large enough for the powder to be ripped down. If the chasm is narrow, when the dough is pressed, the face of the glasses is too close to the surface of the water, the dough will not be broken, and it will flow together in a long line, giving Lod Chong an unattractive appearance.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand
Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong Singapore

       “Cinema” was the inspiration for Lod Chong Singapore. When Thailand still had popular movie theaters like the King, Queen, Grand, Chalermkhet, ChalermThai, Paramount, and Krung Kasem, another cinema on Yaowarat Road, which eventually changed its name to “Chalermburi Cinema,” was another less popular option. The genesis of the Singapore Lod Chong comes from the kitchen of the business “Singapore Food,” a restaurant that had been around for almost 60 years, located at Mo Mee intersection, opposite UOB Bank, Charoen Krung Road, in the region not far from the Singapore cinema, while it was still a Singapore cinema. As a result, young men and women from that era frequently socialize before heading to the Singapore theater to view a film. It is frequently served with Lod Chong, and from the phrase “Lod Chong in front of the Singapore cinema,” it evolved into “Lod Chong Singapore,” which it is today.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

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Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       In Chinatown, Lod Chong is a modest eatery. The restaurant is operated by a family, the family recipes are often kept secret, and the menu is fairly tiny, as are many other eateries in Chinatown. The menu at Lod Chong Singapore is simple: Lod Chong. The Lod Chong is served in a large drinking glass with crushed ice and that lovely sweet sweetness, unlike other eateries. Lod Chong Singapore is distinguished by two characteristics. To begin with, the Lod Chong they provide is considerably sweeter than many others in Bangkok, which attracts a large number of customers. Second, it is quite inexpensive. It will only set you back 22 THB for a glass of ice-cold Lod Chong.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to Pick the Right Pandan Leaves

       The leaves of a good fragrant pandan should be aromatic, thin, glossy, and light green with thorns. Trying not to crush the leaves while smelling them. The fragrant Pandan differs from typical Pandan leaves in that the edges of the leaves are smooth, without thorns, and dark green, unlike pandanus, which is light green. To obtain the lovely hue of Lod chong, Fragrant Pandan should select to use ancient leaves. However, in rural places, Lod chong is commonly prepared in two colors: green and white (without pandan leaves).

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Coconut milk for Thai Lod Chong

       In Lod Chong, excellent sugar is required for coconut milk. Using pandan leaves ripped and knotted into pieces, dissolve jaggery or coconut sugar and coconut milk in a pan. Wait until the sugar has completely dissolved and is bubbling. So, add the coconut milk, but not the water from the white grated coconut, stir rapidly and thoroughly, wait until the sugar boils again, and then turn off the heat. Don’t let it fall apart. Filter it through a fine white cloth, set it aside to cool, then bake candle smoke for 3 hours until aromatic, then serve with Lod Chong.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Sappaya sugar plam

      Furthermore, when adding famous ingredients such as “Sappaya sugar plam,” which is the best jaggery produced by the people of the central region, the traditional Thai Rod Chong becomes even more delectable. When it comes to jaggery, we always miss Phetchaburi sugar, but residents in the central area, such as Sing Buri, Suphan Buri, Chainat, and Uthai Thani, know that palm sugar must only come from Sappaya district in Chainat province. Sappaya palm sugar is distinguished by its appearance, which is widely used as a splicing. An old Thai dessert maker confirms that this sugar has a hard feel when freshly stirred. It will soften if you leave it alone for a while. The Sappaya sugar plam smelled sweet like real sugar from the palm tree, with a hint of smoke, and lingered in your mouth for a long time, leaving a final taste of fresh cow’s milk on the tongue. The sugar has a strong, sweet, somewhat salty flavor that is not as astringent or bitter as regular jaggery. Coconut milk will have an excellent taste and will not be oily when used to create it in Lod Chong. Because many palm trees were taken down and sugar producers limited their quantities, expansive sugar is now difficult to come by. However, if you know the source, you can still purchase it, which must be scheduled throughout the year.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Lod Chong Ingredients

1 3/4 cup flour made from rice

1/4 cup tapioca starch

2 tbsp. arrowroot flour, ground

6 cups lime water

600 g of fresh green pandan leaves, sliced

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to use lime water

2 cups of water to 1 tablespoon of new red lime is the ratio to use. Allow it to float until it becomes clear before scooping it up and using it.

A coconut milk concoction

300 g of coconut cream (no water added).

Coconut milk (200 grams)

500 g sappaya palm sugar

3 pandan leaves (fresh)

candles made in the oven.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Lod Chong

1. Blend pandan leaves and lime juice together until fine, then filter off all but the water and split them into two parts: 4 cups and 2 cups.

2. Combine all three types of flour in a mixing bowl, then pour in the first half of the pandan juice. To form a smooth ball, knead by hand. Slowly pour the remaining pandan juice into the first section, kneading the mixture with your hands until the flour is completely dissolved. Put it in a metal pan after filtering it with a thin white cloth.

3. Place the pan on a medium heat setting. Continuously whisk with a spatula until the dough thickens. The second part is added and mixed in pandan juice.

Mix until the mixture is clear and sticky (takes about 20-30 minutes). In cold water, press the flour using the Lod Chong press mold. Set aside for 15 to 20 minutes in the water. To drain the water, scoop it up and drain it in a strainer. Steamed taro, melons, coconut milk, and ice flakes are served on the side.

Lod Chong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Nutrition of Lod Chong

It has 137.51 kcal of energy. 4.41 g of fat, 1.01 g of protein. 23.98 grams of carbohydrates, 0.16 grams of fiber.

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Kanom Khai Nok Krasa, Thai dessert

       Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling (Kanom Khai Nok Krasa) is a classic Thai dessert. It’s created with sago flour or sago seeds wrapped around a stir-fried golden bean filling. It is difficult to come by nowadays, and few people have ever tasted or seen this type of dish. Because the technique is tedious and complicated, it is not particularly popular on the market. This dessert has a similar history and preparation procedure to Khanom Khai Hong. This article will expose readers to traditional Thai desserts that have been handed down since King Rama I’s reign.

Kanom Khai Nok Krasa (Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling), Thai desserts, Thailand

Kanom Khai Nok Krasa story

       The Kanom Khai Nok Krasa dish is a Thai traditional dessert that has been around since King Rama I’s reign. Its origins and history are comparable to those of Kanom Khai Hong. The ingredients and raw materials are similar to Khanom Khai Hong, as can be seen. The dish came about because King Rama I enjoyed eating the egg of the water monitor (Varanus salvator) because he felt it would make him stronger and help him fight his foes. He had a concubine named Phra Nang Sua when he went to war in Laos. When the King wished to consume the eggs of the water monitor, it was difficult to find due to the time period. As a result, Phra Nang Suea created this delicacy for King Rama I to consume instead of the water monitor’s eggs. Sago flour or granules are wrapped in a golden bean paste (shelled mung bean) filling that mimics bird’s egg bubbles in Kanom Khai Nok Krasa.

Kanom Khai Nok Krasa (Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling), Thai desserts, Thailand

       Later, the recipe was changed to use flour instead of sago, which was then fried and sugar-coated, resulting in Khanom Khai Hong. This type of food is traditionally sprinkled with Kee roh oil (oil created by heating coconut milk without adding water, similar to natural coconut oil), but fresh coconut milk is now used to pour over the dessert before eating because it is easier to find and make. The dessert’s filling must have a rich flavor, soft starch, and ripe, not raw, sago. so that it can become a wonderful and sweet Kanom Khai Nok Krasa.

Kanom Khai Nok Krasa (Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling), Thai desserts, Thailand

Ingredients for Kanom Khai Nok Krasa

combination of flour,

A third of a cup of tiny sago

Warm water (1/2 cup)

1 cup of water

1/2 cup sugar (palm or coconut)

1 1/2 tablespoons tapioca flour

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Kanom Khai Nok Krasa (Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling), Thai desserts, Thailand

Filling ingredients for Kanom Khai Nok Krasa

1/2 cup green beans, shelled

1 cup vegetable oil

1 teaspoon sodium chloride

1 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon of pepper (ground).

Kanom Khai Nok Krasa (Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling), Thai desserts, Thailand

How to Make Kanom Khai Nok Krasa

1. Green beans were steeped in hot water until they bloomed, then cooked until rotten and completely pulverized.

2. Heat the vegetable oil in a pan, then add the ground pepper and salt and sugar to taste. After that, add the ground beans and stir fry until the onion is well distributed. It makes a lump, then leaves it to cool before molding into small cubes around the size of a thumb tip.

3.Bring 1/2 cup of water to a boil, then set aside to cool before pouring into a dish of sago palm and stirring to incorporate. To make the sago more homogeneous and sticky, dissolve the water with palm sugar and bring it to a massage with sago that has been soaked in warm water and mixed with tapioca starch.

Kanom Khai Nok Krasa (Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling), Thai desserts, Thailand

4.After that, it was shaped into a sheet and the filling was added. Cover it carefully with sago to form a bird egg shape. Then put it in the banana leaf nest, oil it, and steam it for 10-15 minutes, and it’ll be done. Bring it to a boil, then spread it out on a dish to serve.

5. If you want to make pandan juice, pour 3/4 cup sago into a basin with boiling water and mix thoroughly. Combine 2 tablespoons thick pandan juice and 1/2 cup sugar in a mixing bowl. Massage with the prepared sago after stirring until completely dissolved. Then add 1 1/2 tablespoons of tapioca flour, stir completely, and mold as before. When steamed, it smells like pandan leaves and has a green color with a yellow filling, making it a lovely delicacy.

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Khanom Khai Hong, Thai dessert

       Khanom Khai Hong or Khanom Khai Hia, is a Thai dessert. It could be classified as Thai doughnut balls. Khanom Khai Hong are fried dessert balls composed of flour and packed with mung bean spice, then deep-fried and topped with icing or white sesame seeds. It has a sweet and salty flavor, and it is crispy on the outside but soft on the inside.

Khanom khai hong, Thai desserts, Thailand

History of Khanom Khai Hong

       Khanom khai hong is a Thai dish that was previously known as khanom khai hia. It could be classified as Thai doughnut balls. Khanom khai hong are fried dessert balls composed of flour and packed with mung bean spice, then deep-fried and topped with icing or white sesame seeds. It has a sweet and salty flavor, and it is crispy on the outside but soft on the inside. Its name literally translates to “swan-egg snack” because of its shape, which resembles a swan egg. King Phutthayotfa Chulalok (King Rama I) is claimed to have enjoyed eating water monitor eggs during the early Rattanakosin Kingdom.

Khanom khai hong, Thai desserts, Thailand

       However, because it was not the season when water monitors deposited eggs, the eggs could not be detected at the time. As a result, Royal Concubine Waen created this dish to serve the King. According to what it replaced, it was given the name khanom khai hia. Later, it was renamed khanom khai hong, as it is now, because water monitors and their Thai names are associated with terrible and evil things in Thai folklore. The Fong Lan, which is egg-shaped and uses glutinous rice flour blended with rice flour, is a dessert that resembles Khanom khai hong. Massage the pumpkin into the dough, then top with a filling of steaming mung beans stir-fried with onion, pepper, and salt. Finally, the process was finished with a fried coating of coconut sugar and a coconut milk simmer. Steamed Sago with Mung Bean Filling is another sort of dessert. The filling is similar to Khanom khai hong, but it is steamed and topped with sago.

Khanom khai hong, Thai desserts, Thailand

Ingredients for Khanom Khai Hong

flour mixture

3 cups glutinous rice flour

1/4 cup rice flour

2 cups coconut grated

3 tablespoons of palm sugar.

3/4 teaspoon ground salt

1/2 cup of warm water.

oil for frying.

Khanom khai hong, Thai desserts, Thailand

The ingredients for the filling

3/4 cup golden beans (shelled mung beans)

1/4 cup shallots, finely chopped

1/4 cup of vegetable oil

4 tablespoons of sugar (granulated)

3/4 teaspoon ground salt

ground pepper as desired.

sugar for coating

1/2 cup sugar (granulated)

1 cup of water

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Khanom khai hong, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Khanom Khai Hong

1. Thoroughly wash the beans and soak them in water overnight (or soak in warm water for at least 3 hours). Rinse the beans well once more. Over medium heat, steam on the nest to cover some white fabric on top of boiling water until cooked, then set aside to cool. Then put it in a blender or pound it until it’s smooth, then set it aside.

2. Cook the shallots in oil until they are aromatic. Stir in the pulverized nuts until everything is well combined. Stir in the sugar, salt, and pepper until the mixture begins to sift from the pan. Remove the pan from the heat and set it aside to cool. Make 10 gram spherical balls out of the mixture.

3. Mix together the glutinous rice flour, rice flour, and white grated coconut in a mixing bowl until the coconut begins to have a little oil. Add the palm sugar and salt, stir well enough to blend, then drizzle in the water a bit at a time.

Khanom khai hong, Thai desserts, Thailand

4. Knead the dough until it forms a ball. Allow the dough to rest for about 20 minutes before shaping it into a ball. Wrap the filling fully around each piece, weighing 15 grams per piece.

5. Fry till golden brown and crispy in a pan over low heat. Scoop up the oil and lay it aside to drain.

6. In a saucepan, combine the sugar and water and cook over medium heat until the mixture becomes sticky. Place the fried snacks in the pan and toss to coat evenly. Remove the pan from the heat and continue to knead the sugar until it crystallizes into a totally white glaze and is entirely dry.

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Kanom Chan, Thai dessert

       Kanom Chan (Steamed Layer Cake) is a classic Thai dish that has been a part of Thai culture since the Sukhothai period. The original layered dessert has a layered pattern of light white layer cakes and is green from the hue of pandan leaves. It has a lovely shape and a delectable taste and aroma of pandan leaves to whet your appetite. It is frequently used by Thais on many important occasions. It doesn’t matter if it’s a wedding ceremony, a blessing ritual for a new home, or daily offerings for the monks. It is also a favorite Thai dessert that Thais can enjoy at every celebration because it is simple to prepare and can be purchased almost anywhere.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

Background information on Kanom Chan

       Kanom Chan can be found in a number of Southeast Asian nations, including Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia, Indonesia, and Vietnam. In Malaysia, Kanom Chan is Kueh Lapis, which is a Chinese treat made from rice flour, tapioca flour, and rice flour, such as cakes, egg buns, and so on. This delicacy is popular in Malaysia and Singapore during the Chinese New Year and Hari Raya. Malaysia received this dessert tradition from Indonesia, which was inspired by the Dutch, who ruled Indonesia at the time. The dish was steamed instead than baked, as this is a more popular cooking method in the country. As a result, the layer cake is known as “Steamed layer cake” in English.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

       Lapis Legit, or Spiku, is a Dutch-influenced delicacy popular in Indonesia. It’s a popular Indonesian delicacy with a Dutch name of “Spekkoek.” Because Koek means cake and Spek means pig belly, the name could have been understood as a layered face resembling pork belly or bacon. This snack is thought to be the first of its kind to come from Germany. We can see that there is a German delicacy called Baumkuchen that appears similar to Spekkoek, but it does not have a chocolate coating. A traditional dessert with a lot of spice is lapis legit. However, for those who are allergic to strong spices, other options are now available. As a result, the recipe can be tweaked to include vanilla, pandan, chocolate, raisins, and prunes in place of spice, or chocolate powder, vanilla essence, pandan flavor, or chopped dried fruit.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

       In Thailand, Kanom Chan was obvious evidence when it arrived, but the Dutch dominated Indonesia from 1800 to 1942, roughly throughout the reigns of Rama 1 and Rama VIII of Thailand, demonstrating that this dessert did not exist during the Ayutthaya period or Krung Thon Buri. Kanom Chan is a type of pastry that can be classed as semi-dry, semi-wet, or non-hard. Because Kanom Chan denotes hierarchy, it was once often used to honor festivals. As a result, Thai people used to make Kanom Chan with up to nine layers because they believed that the number “9” (Kao in Thai signifies prosperity) would allow them to “advance” in their job obligations. In terms of Siam’s historical documentation, which cites the oldest sweets discovered, the gourmet cooks’ cookbook from King Rama V’s era revealed that the Siamese were already familiar with Kanom Chan during his reign. Furthermore, Phraya Anuman Ratchathon “Sathian Koset” (14 December 1888 – 12 July 1969, 5th Land of Rama V – Rama 9) claimed that Kanom Chan was still included in a set of wedding ceremony delicacies (Khan Mak ceremony).

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

Kanom Chan's main ingredients

-4 cups coconut milk

-2 1/2 cups of granulated sugar

-1 1/2 cups of mung bean flour

-1/2 cup concentrated pandan juice

-1/2 cup rice flour

-1/2 cup tapioca starch

-1/2 cup jasmine artificial flavoring mixed with water

-Bakedware with a rectangular shape, such as a rectangular baking pan or a rectangular baking pan (size 10×10 inches or 8×8 inches)

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KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

How to cook Kanom Chan

-In a pot, combine the sugar and coconut milk. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly, for about 5 minutes, or until the sugar dissolves (no need to wait for boiling). Remove the pan from the heat and set it aside to cool. For around 15 minutes, steam the tray or type in a steamer set with boiling water.

-Combine the rice flour, tapioca starch, and mung bean flour in a mixing bowl, then slowly pour in the coconut milk mixture. Knead the dough with your hands until it is smooth and uniform. Knead the dough for about 15 minutes, or until it does not clump. Then strain it through a sieve.

-Divide the flour into two cups, one containing pandan juice and the other containing jasmine juice. Prepare by mixing everything together.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

-Pour the white mixture into the first layer. (Pour about 1/3 cup of the mixture into each layer) into the mold, cover the lid, steam for 5 minutes, open the lid, pour the green mixture into the pan, close the lid, steam for 5 minutes, repeat. Alternate layers until all of the dough has been used up, perhaps 9-10 layers total, with the final layer steaming for around 7 minutes before being removed from the steamer. Allow it to cool completely before serving (about 3 hours).

-Take Kanom Chan out of the tray. In a bowl of boiling water, soak the knife. Cut the Kanom Chan into pieces with your hands, arrange them on a platter, and serve.

KANOM CHAN, Thai desserts, Thailand

Kanom Chan nutrition

Nutrition information, calories, energy and nutrients. 100g layered snack contains 99 kcal, 0.9 g protein, 19.7 g carbohydrate, 2.1 g fat.

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Kanom Krok (Coconut-rice pancakes )

         Kanom Krok (Coconut-rice pancakes ), When it comes to Thai desserts that have been around for a long time, from the past to the present, only “Khanom Krok” comes to mind. It has a fragrant, sweet, and oily flavor. Khanom Krok is a Thai dessert menu that is fragrant with coconut milk and garnished with spring onions. It is possible to modify the recipe to include steamed taro, steamed corn, and various steamed potatoes. Khanom Krok is a traditional Thai dessert made on the stove with flour, sugar, and coconut milk. You have to pick it out of the pan and often put it together when eating. Khanom Khrok can be purchased easily; most of them are sold at street stalls at reasonable prices. Prices range between 15 and 40 baht, depending on the quantity and quality of raw materials available in each store. Khanom Krok is popular throughout Thailand, not just in the central region or Bangkok. Today we’ll learn more about Khanom Krok.

Kanom Krok

Khanom Krok history

         Khanom Krok is a traditional Thai dessert made with rice flour, sugar, and coconut milk that is poured into a pan. When the flour has set, it must be removed from the pan and usually brought in two pieces for joining before serving. The recipe is for a Thai dessert that has been around since the beginning of time. Myanmar, Laos, and Indonesia are also home to this species (Indonesians called Serabi). The Sukhothai heritage literature “Triphum Phra Ruang” mentions that Thai desserts became widely spread during the Ayutthaya period, which is the oldest evidence demonstrating the relationship between desserts and local people. As seen in a number of archives pertaining to the dessert market. Some archives mention “Ban Mo,” a potter’s workshop where Khanom Krok’s stove and pan are made. It demonstrates that “Khanom Krok” would be very popular, and as a result, Khanom Krok pan sold at a high rate. Because rice is the main food in Thailand. As a result, rice is used in a variety of foods and desserts. “Khanom Krok” is one of the menu items that has been altered to encourage Thai people to consume more rice.

Kanom Krok

Khanom Krok nutrition

         Nutrition: It is appropriate for breakfast because it contains carbohydrates that provide our bodies with a lot of energy and coconut milk, which is a good fat that belongs to the group of medium-chain triglycerides, which are fats that our bodies can easily excrete. It also contains fat-soluble vitamins E and A from coconut, as well as corn, taro, and spring onions.

Kanom Krok

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ingredients of Khanom Krok

         Main flour ingredients: 250 g rice flour, 100 g cooked jasmine rice, 120 g lime water (cannot substitute water), 500 ml concentrated coconut milk, 250 ml coconut milk, 60 g granulated sugar, 2 teaspoons salt. Coconut milk ingredients: 500 mL concentrated coconut milk, 80 g granulated sugar, 1/2 teaspoon sea salt + 1/4 teaspoon rice flour, 1 measuring spoon and 1/2 measuring spoon. Toping ingredients: 1-2 steamed corn pods, 1 cup steamed diced taro, 1 cup chopped spring onions, vegetable oil for wiping pan sockets.

Kanom Krok

         Coconut-rice pancakes, also known as Kanom krok, are readily available from street food vendors along the path. The recipe has a good flavor that is a combination of salty and sweet from the coconut milk and sugar; additionally, the fresh vegetables can enhance the flavor. The menu is reasonably priced, ranging between 15 and 40 Bath.

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